Women Can Have The Career They Want Without Sacrificing Their Well-Being

We discuss how women can have the career they want.

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  • Charles Duhigg Explains How to Make Yourself ‘Smarter Faster Better’

    Why do some people always seem to accomplish so much more than everybody else on a given day? 'Usually it's because they have built systems that forced them to understand how they think a little bit better and to contemplate a little bit more,' said Duhigg, author of Smarter Faster Better. 'They actually build systems into their days to force them to think more. And to think in specific ways.' For example, Alphabet (formerly Google) hires the best and brightest engineers, however, they maximize their productivity not because of their intelligence, but due to their teamwork. Duhigg, whose previous book The Power of Habit was a NYT bestseller, said the company spent four years and millions of dollars trying to build the perfect team. They learned the perfect team is not about putting the right people together. It's about creating the right culture. 'They figured out that the most effective teams offer psychological safety, which means that everyone gets a chance to speak, everyone is attuned to each other's non-verbal cues, or what is known as high social sensitivity,' said Duhigg. 'When you get that right culture, that's when a team becomes more than the sum of its parts,' said Duhigg. In terms of a company working "faster", Duhigg offers Disney's effort to finish its film "Frozen" as an example. During that process, Disney succeeded under tight time constraints because it had a process that forced them to focus on what they already knew best. 'Frozen', of course, eventually succeeded in becoming the highest grossing animated feature of all time. Regarding getting 'better' at a particular job, Duhigg said the key to motivation is that people feel most motivated when they feel in control. Finally, Duhigg said it is a common myth that the most productive people have a great deal of luck or money on their side as well. In fact, that is not true. 'Studies show that the most productive people tend to come out of some type of hardship,' said Duhigg. 'They didn't go to the best schools or grow up with rich parents. Instead they grew up in situations where they had to govern their own minds - and that's the key.'