Why Crimea is a Big Deal for Ukraine and Russia

The Crimean Peninsula is in the southeast corner of Ukraine and is still home to Russia'™s Black Sea fleet. It was one of the last strongholds of support for ousted president Viktor Yanukovych, who Russian media say has fled to Moscow for protection.

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