Why 37 Percent of Consumers Feel Ashamed About Debt

If embarrassment comes from a sense of failure then not being able to pay off a credit card is sure to cause a red face. 37 percent of consumers say they feel shame when asked about their credit card debt, according to a study by the National Foundation for Credit Counseling. Credit scores are in second place with 30 percent saying they feel outright embarrassed when disclosing it.

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