Visa's Quarterly Profit Rises 26 Percent

Visa, the world's largest credit and debit card company, reported a 26 percent rise in quarterly profit as consumers spent more using cards on its network. Visa and rival Mastercard have been helped by increasing consumer spending in the United States and a shift to plastic payments in emerging markets. Net income attributable to the company rose to $1.60 billion, or $2.52 per Class A share, from $1.27 billion, or $1.92 per Class A share, a year earlier.

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