'The Daily Show’s' Samantha Bee and Jessica Williams Share Workplace Advice

You know them from Comedy Central’s The Daily Show with Jon Stewart, and now Glamour’s Editor-in-Chief Cindi Leive sits down with the hilarious (and super-smart) Samantha Bee and Jessica Williams for a few workplace Dos and Don’ts.

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Other Advice Videos


  • Mike Germano: How to Give Better Advice When People Ask for Help

    In Chapter 20 of 23 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, VICE Media Chief Digital Officer Mike Germano answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" Germano shares how advice requests can often be asks for other things, including asking for money. He also learns to know when not to give advice - including unsolicited advice - and instead help others make their own decisions. Mike Germano is Chief Digital Officer at VICE Media.

  • Jullien Gordon on How to Give Better Advice When Asked for Help

    In Chapter 14 of 19 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, business coach and public speaker Jullien Gordon answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" When asked for advice, Gordon finds it helpful to start by asking questions and not giving answers. This helps him shift his model for personal development from a "let me teach it to you" approach to providing others space to come up with their own answers. Jullien Gordon is a business coach & consultant.

  • Anatole Faykin on The Privilege and Pleasure of Giving Advice to Friends

    In Chapter 5 of 16 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, Internet entrepreneur Anatole Faykin answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" Faykin shares how giving friends' advice is both a privilege and a pleasure. He notes that giving advice is tough, as often a friend is looking to have a listener and to vent rather to actively seek out feedback. Faykin works to discern those who want to vent from those who actually want advice and answers.

  • Matt Ruby on Being Comfortable Not Getting Asked For Advice

    In Chapter 5 of 19 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, standup comedian and Vooza founder Matt Ruby answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" Ruby shares how he is not often approached for advice. He finds it may be due to coming across as unapproachable or doing work that is not fully understood by others. While Ruby does not try to avoid people, he shares that not being asked for advice is fine with him and allows him to be left alone.

  • Hattie Elliot on How to Give Better Advice When Asked for Help

    In Chapter 4 of 15 in her 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, entrepreneur Hattie Elliot answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You for Help?" As someone who connects people for a living, Elliot learns the most important part of giving advice is to underpromise and overdeliver. This helps to ensure she is able to meet expectations when making promises. She also learns to refine her willingness to help others to focus on a smaller group of close friends and family.

  • Ramsey Pryor: How to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help

    In Chapter 11 of 16 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, product management executive Ramsey Pryor answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You for Help?" With time, Pryor learns to give less prescriptive advice. He learns from his children to give advice is more to be a sounding board and help others make a decision rather than to make a decision for others. Pryor is a product management executive at IBM focused on cloud-based collaboration.

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  • Getting Advice for Making Big Decisions in Your 30s

    In Chapter 23 of 23 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, business strategist Bryan Law answers "At This Point in Your Life, Where Are You Seeking Advice and Coaching?" Now in his thirties, Law shares how he gets advice from a network of people to make more informed decisions. From teacher mentors from Georgetown to an inspiring Angolan friend to his parents to his spouse, Law finds willing people to support him as he faces key life decisions.