South Korea’s Internet Cafes Getting a Makeover

South Korean internet cafes, known as PC Bangs, have long been dark, smoky hideouts for young male gamers. But with a smoking ban starting this year, some owners are focusing on brighter interiors and food menus to attract new customers.

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