New York State Data Breaches in 2013 Hit 7.3 Million People, Highest to Date

2013 was a record year for data breaches in New York, at least according to a report from the New York State Attorney General's office. Public and private institutions in New York experienced more than 900 breaches and more than seven million New Yorkers had their personal information exposed. Threats in 2013 were led by the high profile hacks at Target, where 40 million credit and debit card numbers and 70 million home addresses were stolen nationwide.

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