More MBAs Sour on Employers Who Pay Their Way

Some top finance and consulting firms still offer to pay for employees to pursue full-time MBA programs at elite schools, in exchange for two years of service after graduation. But some employees sour on the arrangements. Melissa Korn reports. Photo: Philip Montgomery for The Wall Street Journal.

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