Miea Sethi: From WSJ Editor to Soap Star

WSJ associate books editor David Propson and former WSJ editor Miea Sethi discuss her transition to her current career as a soap opera star in Pakistan. Photo: 'Jaanum'/A Plus

Related Videos


  • Working Mother Magazines October Editor's Notes

    Jennifer Owen talks about Working Mother Magazines October issue and the focus on flexibility.

  • A Day in the Life of Teen Vogue's Editor in Chief Alyssa Reeder

    Alyssa Reader, 24, is the assistant to Amy Astley, the editor in chief at Teen Vogue . This peek into the life of an assistant to an established editor in chief shines light on what it takes to make it in the fashion-magazine world. Alyssa's bubbly personality, tomboy style, and ability to get things done put her in a position to touch every aspect of the magazine each day.

  • A Day in the Life of Out of Order Magazine Editor in Chief Dorian Grinspan

    Dreaming of being an editor-in-chief? Twenty-year-old Dorian Grinspan gives up a peek into what it’s like to do just that, all before graduating college.

  • Mark Graham on Finding Meaningful Work in Digital Media Editor Job

    In Chapter 8 of 17 in his 2012 Capture Your Flag interview, digital media executive Mark Graham answers "What Makes Your Work Meaningful?" Graham notes he works in entertainment and how his goal is to make things fun for his audience. The challenge is to help his team filter through a crowded pop culture landscape to deliver relevant, enjoyable information they cannot find elsewhere. Mark Graham is currently a managing editor at VH1, an MTV Networks company.

  • How Not to Fail At Opera

    Thomas Hampson, classical musician and opera singer, cautions aspiring opera singers that "Fortune favors the prepared mind."

  • How a Teen Vogue Editor Is Chosen

    Whether you're interested in becoming a magazine editor and/or are an avid Teen Vogue fan, you'll hear firsthand stories of what it takes to produce a top fashion magazine from our panel of editors, led by Editor in Chief Amy Astley.

  • How to Pitch a Story to the Editor

    Mark Katches and Dina Temple Raston explain how to pitch a story to an editor and what the editor is interested in at their lecture at the Berkeley graduate school of journalism.

  • How Pop Culture Writer Grows Into Senior Editor Job

    In Chapter 8 of 19, pop culture writer and editor Mark Graham shares how his new VH1 senior editor role compares with his previous pop culture news writing positions. Graham enjoys the challenge managing multiple interest areas and setting writing team direction to develop narrative stories across topics including network television content as well as online specific programming and content. Graham is currently a senior editor at MTV Networks.

  • How Pop Culture Editor Gets Start in Web TV Series Development at VH1

    In Chapter 2 of 19, pop culture writer and editor Mark Graham shares how his online writing and editorial roles are now overlapping with web series development at VH1. Graham previously worked at VH1 on digital initiatives that did not include television. After returning to VH1 after time at New York Magazine, Graham focuses on Internet and television blended content, including network show extras as well as original online programming.

  • How Not to Get Pigeonholed at Work

    Getting promoted can be hard if one is seen as a capable No. 2 at work. Moss Adams partner Star Fischer joins WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger and Tanya Rivero with her story. Photo: David Ryder/WSJ

  • How an Editor Assembles and Produces a Magazine Photo Shoot

    In Chapter 11 of 13, fashion stylist Lulu Chen highlights the assortment of responsibilities required to assemble and produce a magazine photo shoot. As an editor working on Self Magazine shoots, Chen works under time constraints to create and manage a team, the visuals, and clothing necessary to execute on a project.

  • Michael Kaiser: How Performing Arts Inspire Leadership

    "The Arts" will explore modern civic leadership through the lens of special guest Michael Kaiser, president of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts. Called "the turnaround king," Kaiser has led numerous artistic and cultural organizations, including the American Ballet Theater, the Royal Opera House, and the Alvin Ailey Dance Theater, out of stagnation.

Other Advice Videos


  • Mike Germano on How to Give Better Advice When Asked for Help

    In Chapter 20 of 23 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, VICE Media Chief Digital Officer Mike Germano answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" Germano shares how advice requests can often be asks for other things, including asking for money. He also learns to know when not to give advice - including unsolicited advice - and instead help others make their own decisions. Mike Germano is Chief Digital Officer at VICE Media.

  • Cathy Erway on Resisting Temptation When Asked for Advice

    In Chapter 17 of 20 in her 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, author and food writer Cathy Erway answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You for Help?" Erway shares how it is important to resist temptation to give advice on topics where you may have a personal agenda. Instead, she finds it better to be patient and try to filter away personal or selfish bias to focus on the person asking for advice. Cathy Erway is an author, food writer, copywriter and radio show host.

  • Phil McKenzie on How to Give Better Advice When Asked for Help

    In Chapter 18 of 20 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, entrepreneur Phil McKenzie answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" McKenzie prefaces his willingness to give advice with the fact that knowledge he shares is based on his own circumstances experience. This brings context to the conversation and prevents him from coming across as judgmental or biased. Philip L. McKenzie is the Founder of Influencer Conference, a global content platform.

  • Jullien Gordon on How to Give Better Advice When Asked for Help

    In Chapter 14 of 19 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, business coach and public speaker Jullien Gordon answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" When asked for advice, Gordon finds it helpful to start by asking questions and not giving answers. This helps him shift his model for personal development from a "let me teach it to you" approach to providing others space to come up with their own answers. Jullien Gordon is a business coach & consultant.

  • Anatole Faykin on The Privilege and Pleasure of Giving Advice to Friends

    In Chapter 5 of 16 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, Internet entrepreneur Anatole Faykin answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" Faykin shares how giving friends' advice is both a privilege and a pleasure. He notes that giving advice is tough, as often a friend is looking to have a listener and to vent rather to actively seek out feedback. Faykin works to discern those who want to vent from those who actually want advice and answers.

  • Matt Ruby on Being Comfortable Not Getting Asked For Advice

    In Chapter 5 of 19 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, standup comedian and Vooza founder Matt Ruby answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" Ruby shares how he is not often approached for advice. He finds it may be due to coming across as unapproachable or doing work that is not fully understood by others. While Ruby does not try to avoid people, he shares that not being asked for advice is fine with him and allows him to be left alone.

  • Hattie Elliot on How to Give Better Advice When Asked for Help

    In Chapter 4 of 15 in her 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, entrepreneur Hattie Elliot answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You for Help?" As someone who connects people for a living, Elliot learns the most important part of giving advice is to underpromise and overdeliver. This helps to ensure she is able to meet expectations when making promises. She also learns to refine her willingness to help others to focus on a smaller group of close friends and family.

  • Ramsey Pryor: How to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help

    In Chapter 11 of 16 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, product management executive Ramsey Pryor answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You for Help?" With time, Pryor learns to give less prescriptive advice. He learns from his children to give advice is more to be a sounding board and help others make a decision rather than to make a decision for others. Pryor is a product management executive at IBM focused on cloud-based collaboration.