McDonald's New 'Happy' Mascot Dubbed McScary on Social Media

McDonald's restaurant chain says its new 'Happy' mascot will bring 'fun and excitement' to its children's meals, but social media contend the toothy, red box-shaped character will have the opposite effect.

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