Liberal Arts Salaries Are a Marathon, Not a Sprint

It's no secret that recent graduates with degrees in the liberal arts are out-earned by most of their classmates. But in the long run, they catch up to at least some of their peers. Melissa Korn reports on the News Hub. Photo: Getty Images.

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