Lessons from the Class of 2004

Ten years after graduation, how has one high school's graduating class learned to succeed and handle failure? WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger and York School class of 2004 alumna Meagan Rehberg join Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero with the answers. Photo: Craig Lee for the Wall Street Journal

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  • Moving Up Quickly in the Office, But at a Cost

    Psychologists have identified personality traits that help some people rise through the ranks, but there is a cost to certain behaviors. WSJ’s Sue Shellenbarger and Seth Spain a professor from SUNY Binghamton University join Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero.

  • How to Avoid Being Pigeonholed at Work

    When good workers suffer from "the competency curse," they can end being pigeonholed into tasks they do well instead of a track that allows for growth. WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger and Danielle Blimline, who negotiated her way into a promotion, discuss on Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero.

  • How To Win the Conference Game

    WSJ’s Sue Shellenbarger and Sandra Arnold Inc.'s Stefany Stanley tell Tanya Rivero how to come out of conferences with more than just business cards.

  • The Right Way to Make Excuses at Work

    Are you sick of people’s excuses at work? WSJ columnist Sue Shellenbarger joins Tanya Rivero to explain how excuses used the right way can save the day on the job.

  • The Best Way to Handle Office Gossip

    Becoming the target of office gossip can be uncomfortable. WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger and career coach Michele Woodward talk tips with Tanya Rivero.

  • The Battle for the Conference Room

    With more meetings but less space to conduct them, the conference room can be a source of tension. WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger discusses with Tanya Rivero.

  • How to Deal with the Office Oversharer

    It’s a source of tension in many workplaces – nonstop conversation from the office 'oversharer.' WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger offers tips on how bosses and employees can navigate oversharing without hurt feelings on Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero.

  • The Best Way to Handle Workplace Criticism

    Can you learn to control the knee-jerk tendency to turn defensive or angry when faced with workplace criticism? WSJ columnist Sue Shellenbarger discusses on Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero.

  • How Not to Get Pigeonholed at Work

    Getting promoted can be hard if one is seen as a capable No. 2 at work. Moss Adams partner Star Fischer joins WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger and Tanya Rivero with her story. Photo: David Ryder/WSJ

  • How to Pick Your Battles on the Job

    When is a workplace dispute worth the trouble of resolving? WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger and executive coach Lynne Eisaguirre discuss on Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero.

  • How to Not Come Home in Bad Mood

    Many people come home from work in a bad mood but there are techniques to combat post-office crankiness. WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger discusses with Tanya Rivero.

  • Can Anyone Succeed as a Tough Boss?

    As managers emphasize culture, engagement and employee happiness over iron-fisted leadership, is there a place left for tough bosses? WSJ's Melissa Korn discusses evolving workplace dynamics on Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero. Photo: Getty.

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  • Mike Germano on How to Give Better Advice When Asked for Help

    In Chapter 20 of 23 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, VICE Media Chief Digital Officer Mike Germano answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" Germano shares how advice requests can often be asks for other things, including asking for money. He also learns to know when not to give advice - including unsolicited advice - and instead help others make their own decisions. Mike Germano is Chief Digital Officer at VICE Media.

  • Cathy Erway on Resisting Temptation When Asked for Advice

    In Chapter 17 of 20 in her 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, author and food writer Cathy Erway answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You for Help?" Erway shares how it is important to resist temptation to give advice on topics where you may have a personal agenda. Instead, she finds it better to be patient and try to filter away personal or selfish bias to focus on the person asking for advice. Cathy Erway is an author, food writer, copywriter and radio show host.

  • Phil McKenzie on How to Give Better Advice When Asked for Help

    In Chapter 18 of 20 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, entrepreneur Phil McKenzie answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" McKenzie prefaces his willingness to give advice with the fact that knowledge he shares is based on his own circumstances experience. This brings context to the conversation and prevents him from coming across as judgmental or biased. Philip L. McKenzie is the Founder of Influencer Conference, a global content platform.

  • Jullien Gordon on How to Give Better Advice When Asked for Help

    In Chapter 14 of 19 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, business coach and public speaker Jullien Gordon answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" When asked for advice, Gordon finds it helpful to start by asking questions and not giving answers. This helps him shift his model for personal development from a "let me teach it to you" approach to providing others space to come up with their own answers. Jullien Gordon is a business coach & consultant.

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  • Anatole Faykin on The Privilege and Pleasure of Giving Advice to Friends

    In Chapter 5 of 16 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, Internet entrepreneur Anatole Faykin answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" Faykin shares how giving friends' advice is both a privilege and a pleasure. He notes that giving advice is tough, as often a friend is looking to have a listener and to vent rather to actively seek out feedback. Faykin works to discern those who want to vent from those who actually want advice and answers.

  • Matt Ruby on Being Comfortable Not Getting Asked For Advice

    In Chapter 5 of 19 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, standup comedian and Vooza founder Matt Ruby answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" Ruby shares how he is not often approached for advice. He finds it may be due to coming across as unapproachable or doing work that is not fully understood by others. While Ruby does not try to avoid people, he shares that not being asked for advice is fine with him and allows him to be left alone.

  • Hattie Elliot on How to Give Better Advice When Asked for Help

    In Chapter 4 of 15 in her 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, entrepreneur Hattie Elliot answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You for Help?" As someone who connects people for a living, Elliot learns the most important part of giving advice is to underpromise and overdeliver. This helps to ensure she is able to meet expectations when making promises. She also learns to refine her willingness to help others to focus on a smaller group of close friends and family.