Lessons from the Class of 2004

Ten years after graduation, how has one high school's graduating class learned to succeed and handle failure? WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger and York School class of 2004 alumna Meagan Rehberg join Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero with the answers. Photo: Craig Lee for the Wall Street Journal

Related Videos


  • Moving Up Quickly in the Office, But at a Cost

    Psychologists have identified personality traits that help some people rise through the ranks, but there is a cost to certain behaviors. WSJ’s Sue Shellenbarger and Seth Spain a professor from SUNY Binghamton University join Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero.

  • How to Avoid Being Pigeonholed at Work

    When good workers suffer from "the competency curse," they can end being pigeonholed into tasks they do well instead of a track that allows for growth. WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger and Danielle Blimline, who negotiated her way into a promotion, discuss on Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero.

  • How To Win the Conference Game

    WSJ’s Sue Shellenbarger and Sandra Arnold Inc.'s Stefany Stanley tell Tanya Rivero how to come out of conferences with more than just business cards.

  • The Right Way to Make Excuses at Work

    Are you sick of people’s excuses at work? WSJ columnist Sue Shellenbarger joins Tanya Rivero to explain how excuses used the right way can save the day on the job.

  • The Best Way to Handle Office Gossip

    Becoming the target of office gossip can be uncomfortable. WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger and career coach Michele Woodward talk tips with Tanya Rivero.

  • The Battle for the Conference Room

    With more meetings but less space to conduct them, the conference room can be a source of tension. WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger discusses with Tanya Rivero.

  • How to Deal with the Office Oversharer

    It’s a source of tension in many workplaces – nonstop conversation from the office 'oversharer.' WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger offers tips on how bosses and employees can navigate oversharing without hurt feelings on Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero.

  • The Best Way to Handle Workplace Criticism

    Can you learn to control the knee-jerk tendency to turn defensive or angry when faced with workplace criticism? WSJ columnist Sue Shellenbarger discusses on Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero.

  • How Not to Get Pigeonholed at Work

    Getting promoted can be hard if one is seen as a capable No. 2 at work. Moss Adams partner Star Fischer joins WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger and Tanya Rivero with her story. Photo: David Ryder/WSJ

  • How to Pick Your Battles on the Job

    When is a workplace dispute worth the trouble of resolving? WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger and executive coach Lynne Eisaguirre discuss on Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero.

  • How to Not Come Home in Bad Mood

    Many people come home from work in a bad mood but there are techniques to combat post-office crankiness. WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger discusses with Tanya Rivero.

  • Why Do Companies Take a Month to Hire Someone?

    Hiring has become a long-term investment with companies often putting applicants through a gauntlet of serial interviews. WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger joins Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero to explain the new rules of this grueling game, showing how jobseekers can navigate the process and succeed without getting frustrated. Photo: istock

Other Advice Videos


  • Drone Buying Guide

    Interested in buying a drone? Here's some advice from an expert pilot on how to get into the hobby.

  • Managing Drug Costs

    Best ways to reduce your prescription drug expenses – from using online retailers to getting 90-day supply.

  • Tax Hacks 2016: Last Minute Tax Advice

    The IRS reports about three quarters of Americans have filed their tax returns. Are you among the remaining people who still need to file?

  • Author Valerie Fitzgerald Talks About Her New Financial Advice Book Heart and Sold

    Heart and Sold takes a look at how to create a successful business starting from the inside, while providing very concrete business-building tools.

  • Interview Tips to Get the Job

    Although you may think your resume should speak for itself, being dynamic in an interview can make all the difference in standing out among the other applicants. Here are a few tips to keep in mind before you put on your best business attire and head out the door.

  • Why Kids Who Misbehave Earn More Money As Adults

    Rule-breaking, defiant kids often end up richer than their more responsible peers, according to a new study. The WSJ's Lee Hawkins explains why.

  • Charles Duhigg Explains How to Make Yourself ‘Smarter Faster Better’

    Why do some people always seem to accomplish so much more than everybody else on a given day? 'Usually it's because they have built systems that forced them to understand how they think a little bit better and to contemplate a little bit more,' said Duhigg, author of Smarter Faster Better. 'They actually build systems into their days to force them to think more. And to think in specific ways.' For example, Alphabet (formerly Google) hires the best and brightest engineers, however, they maximize their productivity not because of their intelligence, but due to their teamwork. Duhigg, whose previous book The Power of Habit was a NYT bestseller, said the company spent four years and millions of dollars trying to build the perfect team. They learned the perfect team is not about putting the right people together. It's about creating the right culture. 'They figured out that the most effective teams offer psychological safety, which means that everyone gets a chance to speak, everyone is attuned to each other's non-verbal cues, or what is known as high social sensitivity,' said Duhigg. 'When you get that right culture, that's when a team becomes more than the sum of its parts,' said Duhigg. In terms of a company working "faster", Duhigg offers Disney's effort to finish its film "Frozen" as an example. During that process, Disney succeeded under tight time constraints because it had a process that forced them to focus on what they already knew best. 'Frozen', of course, eventually succeeded in becoming the highest grossing animated feature of all time. Regarding getting 'better' at a particular job, Duhigg said the key to motivation is that people feel most motivated when they feel in control. Finally, Duhigg said it is a common myth that the most productive people have a great deal of luck or money on their side as well. In fact, that is not true. 'Studies show that the most productive people tend to come out of some type of hardship,' said Duhigg. 'They didn't go to the best schools or grow up with rich parents. Instead they grew up in situations where they had to govern their own minds - and that's the key.'