Lessons from the Class of 2004

Ten years after graduation, how has one high school's graduating class learned to succeed and handle failure? WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger and York School class of 2004 alumna Meagan Rehberg join Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero with the answers. Photo: Craig Lee for the Wall Street Journal

Related Videos


  • Moving Up Quickly in the Office, But at a Cost

    Psychologists have identified personality traits that help some people rise through the ranks, but there is a cost to certain behaviors. WSJ’s Sue Shellenbarger and Seth Spain a professor from SUNY Binghamton University join Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero.

  • How to Avoid Being Pigeonholed at Work

    When good workers suffer from "the competency curse," they can end being pigeonholed into tasks they do well instead of a track that allows for growth. WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger and Danielle Blimline, who negotiated her way into a promotion, discuss on Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero.

  • How To Win the Conference Game

    WSJ’s Sue Shellenbarger and Sandra Arnold Inc.'s Stefany Stanley tell Tanya Rivero how to come out of conferences with more than just business cards.

  • The Right Way to Make Excuses at Work

    Are you sick of people’s excuses at work? WSJ columnist Sue Shellenbarger joins Tanya Rivero to explain how excuses used the right way can save the day on the job.

  • The Best Way to Handle Office Gossip

    Becoming the target of office gossip can be uncomfortable. WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger and career coach Michele Woodward talk tips with Tanya Rivero.

  • The Battle for the Conference Room

    With more meetings but less space to conduct them, the conference room can be a source of tension. WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger discusses with Tanya Rivero.

  • How to Deal with the Office Oversharer

    It’s a source of tension in many workplaces – nonstop conversation from the office 'oversharer.' WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger offers tips on how bosses and employees can navigate oversharing without hurt feelings on Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero.

  • The Best Way to Handle Workplace Criticism

    Can you learn to control the knee-jerk tendency to turn defensive or angry when faced with workplace criticism? WSJ columnist Sue Shellenbarger discusses on Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero.

  • How Not to Get Pigeonholed at Work

    Getting promoted can be hard if one is seen as a capable No. 2 at work. Moss Adams partner Star Fischer joins WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger and Tanya Rivero with her story. Photo: David Ryder/WSJ

  • How to Pick Your Battles on the Job

    When is a workplace dispute worth the trouble of resolving? WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger and executive coach Lynne Eisaguirre discuss on Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero.

  • Can Anyone Succeed as a Tough Boss?

    As managers emphasize culture, engagement and employee happiness over iron-fisted leadership, is there a place left for tough bosses? WSJ's Melissa Korn discusses evolving workplace dynamics on Lunch Break with Tanya Rivero. Photo: Getty.

  • How to Switch Careers Internally

    Moving ahead in your career can be hard enough but can you switch careers internally? Sue Shellenbarger joins Lunch Break with tips on how to move ahead without leaving your company. Photo: Damien Maloney for The Wall Street Journal.

Other Advice Videos


  • Anatole Faykin on The Privilege and Pleasure of Giving Advice to Friends

    In Chapter 5 of 16 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, Internet entrepreneur Anatole Faykin answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" Faykin shares how giving friends' advice is both a privilege and a pleasure. He notes that giving advice is tough, as often a friend is looking to have a listener and to vent rather to actively seek out feedback. Faykin works to discern those who want to vent from those who actually want advice and answers.

  • Matt Ruby on Being Comfortable Not Getting Asked For Advice

    In Chapter 5 of 19 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, standup comedian and Vooza founder Matt Ruby answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" Ruby shares how he is not often approached for advice. He finds it may be due to coming across as unapproachable or doing work that is not fully understood by others. While Ruby does not try to avoid people, he shares that not being asked for advice is fine with him and allows him to be left alone.

  • Hattie Elliot on How to Give Better Advice When Asked for Help

    In Chapter 4 of 15 in her 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, entrepreneur Hattie Elliot answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You for Help?" As someone who connects people for a living, Elliot learns the most important part of giving advice is to underpromise and overdeliver. This helps to ensure she is able to meet expectations when making promises. She also learns to refine her willingness to help others to focus on a smaller group of close friends and family.

  • Ramsey Pryor: How to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help

    In Chapter 11 of 16 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, product management executive Ramsey Pryor answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You for Help?" With time, Pryor learns to give less prescriptive advice. He learns from his children to give advice is more to be a sounding board and help others make a decision rather than to make a decision for others. Pryor is a product management executive at IBM focused on cloud-based collaboration.

  • 6 Celebrated Women Offer Advice to Their 20-Year Old Selves

    What advice would you give your 20-year-old self? asked Real Simple.

  • Rachel Lehmann-Haupt on Seeking Advice From Working Mom Friends

    In Chapter 17 of 17 in her 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, author and small business owner Rachel Lehmann-Haupt answers "At This Moment in Your Life, Where Are You Seeking Advice and Coaching?" Lehmann-Haupt shares how she gathers working mom friends she respects to help her shape next steps in her life as a working mom. She finds her friends understand her needs as someone trying to be a good mom and strike the right work-life balance in an aspiring career. Rachel Lehmann-Haupt is a writer.

  • Getting Advice for Making Big Decisions in Your 30s

    In Chapter 23 of 23 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, business strategist Bryan Law answers "At This Point in Your Life, Where Are You Seeking Advice and Coaching?" Now in his thirties, Law shares how he gets advice from a network of people to make more informed decisions. From teacher mentors from Georgetown to an inspiring Angolan friend to his parents to his spouse, Law finds willing people to support him as he faces key life decisions.

  • Louise Langheier on Two Ways to Give Better Career Advice

    In Chapter 7 of 21 in her 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, social entrepreneur Louise Langheier answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" Langheier shares two ways she has learned to give better advice. The first is honing in on the specific question the person seeking advice is really trying to answer. The second is appreciating the learning experience that comes with being asked to give advice.