Lauren Serota on Using Reflection to Understand How Others See You

In Chapter 18 of 21 in her 2013 Capture Your Flag interview, creative director and educator Lauren Serota answers "What Role Has Reflection Played in Shaping Your Personal Growth?" Serota finds reflection helps her avoid getting caught in her own head and pushes her to examine her actions from the perspective of others. This underscores an important lesson she has learned: the value of regularly asking for and receiving feedback on her actions and work.

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  • Lauren Serota on Learning to Be a More Productive Communicator

    In Chapter 11 of 21 in her 2013 Capture Your Flag interview, creative director and educator Lauren Serota answers "At This Point in Your Life, Where Are You Seeking Advice and Coaching?" As she goes through a job transition from individual contributor to manager, Serota seeks feedback to be a better communicator and collaborator working with other leaders on the job. She finds this skill transferable to her personal relationships in addition to those at work.

  • Lauren Serota on Unexpected Ways Teaching Enhances Your Career

    In Chapter 17 of 21 in her 2013 Capture Your Flag interview, creative director and educator Lauren Serota answers "How Has Teaching Opened New Opportunities in Your Career?" Each graduating student becomes an ambassador not only for the school but also for each faculty member. This creates a feedback loop Serota uses to learn from alumni and build her reputation as a teacher willing to learn and share to new audiences. This opens new opportunities for her.

  • Lauren Serota on Building Creative Direction Communication Skills

    In Chapter 9 of 21 in her 2013 Capture Your Flag interview, creative director and educator Lauren Serota answers "How Are You Learning to Communicate More Effectively?" Serota finds more exposure to the world and to people helps her understand how to communicate differently to different people. In her job role, she is responsible for giving creative direction to designers. She notes how designer personalities differ and how she finds it helpful tailoring feedback, both conceptual to tactical.

  • Lauren Serota on Rethinking Career Goals After Three Years at a Job

    In Chapter 5 of 21 in her 2013 Capture Your Flag interview, creative director and educator Lauren Serota answers "How Are Your Aspirations Changing As Your Experience Grows?" Now in her third-year working at frog design, Serota shares how her career aspirations are becoming less about individual recognition and more about sharing knowledge to improve how others learn and live. She reflects to a time when her goals were more narcissistic and how her goals have progressively shifted.

  • Lauren Serota on Turning 30 and Letting Go of Expectations

    In Chapter 19 of 21 in her 2013 Capture Your Flag interview, creative director and educator Lauren Serota answers "What is on Your Mind as You Turn 30 This Year?" Serota looks at turning 30 as an opportunity for reflection and to assess where she has been, where she is, and where she wants to go. She looks at relationships, her work experience, and accomplishments and makes it a point to focus on what she has done versus what others have done.

  • Lauren Serota on Blending Personal Passions and Professional Goals

    In Chapter 21 of 21 in her 2013 Capture Your Flag interview, creative director and educator Lauren Serota answers "How Are Your Personal Experiences Shaping Your Professional Aspirations?" Serota shares how work and life experiences integrate together into how she lives her life. She notes how life outside work - from exercise and cycling to personal relationships to traveling - inform life inside work and vice versa. As a creative leader, she looks to always learn.

  • Lauren Serota on How to Build Relationship Rapport and Trust

    In Chapter 8 of 21 in her 2013 Capture Your Flag interview, creative director and educator Lauren Serota answers "How Do You Establish Trust When Building Relationships?" Serota shares how she has learned to build rapport, as trust is called in research terms, with others through being honest and inquisitive. She shares how defining what trust means depends on the context of a relationship. She uses trust-building examples from her fiancee personal relationship and ones from work.

  • Lauren Serota on the Give and Take of Learning and Teaching Design

    In Chapter 6 of 21 in her 2013 Capture Your Flag interview, creative director and educator Lauren Serota answers "How Are Your Responsibilities Changing As You Gain Work Experience?" After three years working at frog design, Serota finds she is ready to transition from learning from job experience to teaching others what she has learned on the job. This coincides with growing creative leader responsibilities at work and continuing teaching responsibilities at her school.

  • Lauren Serota on Thinking About Your Biological Clock At Age 30

    In Chapter 20 of 21 in her 2013 Capture Your Flag interview, creative director and educator Lauren Serota answers "How Are Your Personal Priorities Changing As You Get Older?" Now 30 years old, Serota shares how she thinks differently about her relationship and starting a family than she did when she was in her late twenties. The biological clock considerations for having a family now are more real in her own life.

  • Lauren Serota on What It Means to Be a Creative Leader

    In Chapter 7 of 21 in her 2013 Capture Your Flag interview, creative director and educator Lauren Serota answers "What Does It Mean to Be a Leader in What You Do?" Serota leads by being able to ingest multiple perspectives, synthesize them and create a point of view that unites a team around a common vision. New in her role as assistant creative director, Serota finds teammates seeking her creative leadership at an individual task or tactical level.

  • Lauren Serota on Getting Parent Support Making Career Choices

    In Chapter 1 of 21 in her 2013 Capture Your Flag interview, creative director and educator Lauren Serota answers "Where Has Your Family Been Most Supportive in Your Career Development?" Serota shares how her parents creative a trusting yet objective home environment and why that helped her learn to make better decisions. Lauren Serota works as an associate creative director at frog design. She is also a teacher at the Austin Center for Design (AC4D).

  • Lauren Serota on Honing Career Skills Working in Australia

    In Chapter 2 of 21 in her 2013 Capture Your Flag interview, creative director and educator Lauren Serota answers "How Has International Work Experience Contributed to Your Professional Development?" Working on several projects for an Australian client gives Serota a firsthand look into the nuances of current issues in Australian culture and linguistics, in particular the tension between Westerners and indigenous people.

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  • Charles Duhigg Explains How to Make Yourself ‘Smarter Faster Better’

    Why do some people always seem to accomplish so much more than everybody else on a given day? 'Usually it's because they have built systems that forced them to understand how they think a little bit better and to contemplate a little bit more,' said Duhigg, author of Smarter Faster Better. 'They actually build systems into their days to force them to think more. And to think in specific ways.' For example, Alphabet (formerly Google) hires the best and brightest engineers, however, they maximize their productivity not because of their intelligence, but due to their teamwork. Duhigg, whose previous book The Power of Habit was a NYT bestseller, said the company spent four years and millions of dollars trying to build the perfect team. They learned the perfect team is not about putting the right people together. It's about creating the right culture. 'They figured out that the most effective teams offer psychological safety, which means that everyone gets a chance to speak, everyone is attuned to each other's non-verbal cues, or what is known as high social sensitivity,' said Duhigg. 'When you get that right culture, that's when a team becomes more than the sum of its parts,' said Duhigg. In terms of a company working "faster", Duhigg offers Disney's effort to finish its film "Frozen" as an example. During that process, Disney succeeded under tight time constraints because it had a process that forced them to focus on what they already knew best. 'Frozen', of course, eventually succeeded in becoming the highest grossing animated feature of all time. Regarding getting 'better' at a particular job, Duhigg said the key to motivation is that people feel most motivated when they feel in control. Finally, Duhigg said it is a common myth that the most productive people have a great deal of luck or money on their side as well. In fact, that is not true. 'Studies show that the most productive people tend to come out of some type of hardship,' said Duhigg. 'They didn't go to the best schools or grow up with rich parents. Instead they grew up in situations where they had to govern their own minds - and that's the key.'