How Much Work is Too Much Work?

How do you spot when you've taken on enough and need to quit saying yes to more projects and social commitments? When do you realize you've reached your limit, what should you do? WSJ's Sue Shellenbarger and training coach Amy Ruppert discuss on Lunch Break. Photo: Getty.

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