How Do Feminine Features Impact Negotiations?

A new study shows that people prefer to negotiate against someone with feminine features. Cornell University Ph.D. candidate Eric Gladstone, a co-author of the study, discusses on the News Hub with Sara Murray. Photo: iStock\Yuri_Arcurs.

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