FUBU Founder Daymond John on Starting a Billion Dollar Business

Entrepreneur, TV personality, author, and motivational speaker Daymond John shares how he went from waiting tables at Red Lobster to becoming a fashion mogul and "Shark Tank" star! Daymond also shares the story of his make or break pitch to LL Cool J that helped launch the FUBU brand. Daymond also discusses how he and the ‘Shark Tank’ team scout contestants for the show.

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Other Advice Videos


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  • Matt Ruby on Being Comfortable Not Getting Asked For Advice

    In Chapter 5 of 19 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, standup comedian and Vooza founder Matt Ruby answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" Ruby shares how he is not often approached for advice. He finds it may be due to coming across as unapproachable or doing work that is not fully understood by others. While Ruby does not try to avoid people, he shares that not being asked for advice is fine with him and allows him to be left alone.

  • Hattie Elliot on How to Give Better Advice When Asked for Help

    In Chapter 4 of 15 in her 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, entrepreneur Hattie Elliot answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You for Help?" As someone who connects people for a living, Elliot learns the most important part of giving advice is to underpromise and overdeliver. This helps to ensure she is able to meet expectations when making promises. She also learns to refine her willingness to help others to focus on a smaller group of close friends and family.

  • Ramsey Pryor: How to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help

    In Chapter 11 of 16 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, product management executive Ramsey Pryor answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You for Help?" With time, Pryor learns to give less prescriptive advice. He learns from his children to give advice is more to be a sounding board and help others make a decision rather than to make a decision for others. Pryor is a product management executive at IBM focused on cloud-based collaboration.

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  • Getting Advice for Making Big Decisions in Your 30s

    In Chapter 23 of 23 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, business strategist Bryan Law answers "At This Point in Your Life, Where Are You Seeking Advice and Coaching?" Now in his thirties, Law shares how he gets advice from a network of people to make more informed decisions. From teacher mentors from Georgetown to an inspiring Angolan friend to his parents to his spouse, Law finds willing people to support him as he faces key life decisions.

  • Rachel Lehmann-Haupt on Seeking Advice From Working Mom Friends

    In Chapter 17 of 17 in her 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, author and small business owner Rachel Lehmann-Haupt answers "At This Moment in Your Life, Where Are You Seeking Advice and Coaching?" Lehmann-Haupt shares how she gathers working mom friends she respects to help her shape next steps in her life as a working mom. She finds her friends understand her needs as someone trying to be a good mom and strike the right work-life balance in an aspiring career. Rachel Lehmann-Haupt is a writer.

  • Louise Langheier on Two Ways to Give Better Career Advice

    In Chapter 7 of 21 in her 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, social entrepreneur Louise Langheier answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" Langheier shares two ways she has learned to give better advice. The first is honing in on the specific question the person seeking advice is really trying to answer. The second is appreciating the learning experience that comes with being asked to give advice.