France Tries to Block GE-Alstom Deal by Strengthening Takeover Law

The saga in GE's bid to buy some assets of France's Alstom for more than $15.6 billion continues. The French government, which has already said it opposes the deal, is going one step further by trying to grab new powers that would allow it to intervene in foreign takeovers.

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