Companies Find Autism Can Be an Asset in the Workplace

Some employers increasingly are viewing autism as an asset in the workplace. For example, Software company SAP believes autism may make some individuals better at certain jobs than those without autism. Shirley Wang and SAP Managing Director Liam Ryan discuss. Photo: Ciaran Dolan for The Wall Street Journal.

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Other Advice Videos


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  • Mike Germano on How to Give Better Advice When Asked for Help

    In Chapter 20 of 23 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, VICE Media Chief Digital Officer Mike Germano answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" Germano shares how advice requests can often be asks for other things, including asking for money. He also learns to know when not to give advice - including unsolicited advice - and instead help others make their own decisions. Mike Germano is Chief Digital Officer at VICE Media.

  • Cathy Erway on Resisting Temptation When Asked for Advice

    In Chapter 17 of 20 in her 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, author and food writer Cathy Erway answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You for Help?" Erway shares how it is important to resist temptation to give advice on topics where you may have a personal agenda. Instead, she finds it better to be patient and try to filter away personal or selfish bias to focus on the person asking for advice. Cathy Erway is an author, food writer, copywriter and radio show host.

  • Phil McKenzie on How to Give Better Advice When Asked for Help

    In Chapter 18 of 20 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, entrepreneur Phil McKenzie answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" McKenzie prefaces his willingness to give advice with the fact that knowledge he shares is based on his own circumstances experience. This brings context to the conversation and prevents him from coming across as judgmental or biased. Philip L. McKenzie is the Founder of Influencer Conference, a global content platform.

  • Jullien Gordon on How to Give Better Advice When Asked for Help

    In Chapter 14 of 19 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, business coach and public speaker Jullien Gordon answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" When asked for advice, Gordon finds it helpful to start by asking questions and not giving answers. This helps him shift his model for personal development from a "let me teach it to you" approach to providing others space to come up with their own answers. Jullien Gordon is a business coach & consultant.

  • My Advice to Women

    My Advice to Women

  • Anatole Faykin on The Privilege and Pleasure of Giving Advice to Friends

    In Chapter 5 of 16 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, Internet entrepreneur Anatole Faykin answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" Faykin shares how giving friends' advice is both a privilege and a pleasure. He notes that giving advice is tough, as often a friend is looking to have a listener and to vent rather to actively seek out feedback. Faykin works to discern those who want to vent from those who actually want advice and answers.

  • Matt Ruby on Being Comfortable Not Getting Asked For Advice

    In Chapter 5 of 19 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, standup comedian and Vooza founder Matt Ruby answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" Ruby shares how he is not often approached for advice. He finds it may be due to coming across as unapproachable or doing work that is not fully understood by others. While Ruby does not try to avoid people, he shares that not being asked for advice is fine with him and allows him to be left alone.