Chiefs at Big Firms Are Often Last to Get Bad News

At big companies, bad news travels slowly. Doing the right thing is often incompatible with pleasing the boss - but CEOs claim they don’t want to be isolated: They’d rather hear bad news than be saddled with a mess to clean up down the line. Adam Auriemma reports. Photo: Getty Images.

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