5 Types Of Friends That Could Actually Be Costing You A Lot Of Money

Tony Zimmer explains how some types of friends can actually cost you a lot of money in the long run.

Related Videos


  • What's the Cost of Your Happiness?

    We all spend on frivolous things whether it be shoes, bags, gadgets, concert tickets, but is spending hard earned cash on these material items a bad idea? AOL Personal Finance Expert and LearnVest.com Founder and CEO Alexa Von Tobel breaks down the way spending on your happiness could actually be a good investment. For more advice from Alexa, visit AOL.com

  • Couponing Tips That Will Save You A Lot Of Money

    Couponing is a great way to save money and has been popularized on TV shows such as Extreme Couponing. One expert shares some tips for using coupons at your grocery store to save money.

  • Can You Really Lend Money to a Friend?

    Our Personal finance expert, Farnoosh Torabi, cuts to the chase here!

  • Commonly-Missed Tax Deductions That Could Save You A Lot Of Money

    Today we learn about several commonly-missed tax deductions that could save you money when filing your taxes.

  • Can You Afford To Have Children

    Personal finance expert Suze Orman had some expert advice to share when it comes to deciding whether or not you can afford having a child. According to Suze, the most important factor to take into consideration is not how much you make, but how much money you and your partner actually take home each month after taxes. “Don’t be fooled!” she warns. Part of the series Mondays With Marlo on Marlothomas.com.

  • Finance a New or Used Car Purchase: What You Need to Know

    The average cost of buying a car continues to rise, with new car prices recently hitting a record high of over $32,000. Not surprisingly, financing is more important than ever, with Americans borrowing an average of $27,000 for new cars and $18,000 for used cars. But once that new car smell starts to fade, a large auto loan can leave you with buyer's remorse. If you're in the market for a new car, here's how to make sure you zoom away with the best financing deal for your budget.

  • 5 Questions to Ask Yourself Before Mixing Finance With Family

    Family and financial assistance can be an awkward combination. Paying down debt, medical bills and tuition costs can all take their toll on personal relationships.

  • Can Obamacare Help You Save Money on Your Car Insurance?

    Obamacare, the law that could save you 2 percent or more on car insurance? A study released Wednesday by the Rand Corporation finds that as more people gain health insurance, the costs of other types of insurance could go down. Jonnelle Marte reports. Photo: Getty.

  • Will Stopping to Try Samples Cost You More Money at the Grocery Store?

    Food Network star Melissa d'Arabian walks you through the ways in which some interruptions could cause you to spend more money at the grocery store this holiday season.

  • Are You Actually Saving Too Much For Retirement?

    Is it possible to save too much for retirement? One financial expert says this might be the case, and he explains how you can properly save for your retirement.

  • What Is The Cost of the American Dream?

    Finance expert Richelle Shaw sits down to talk about the cost of the American Dream and how you can build your own successful business!

  • How Much Emergency Money You Should Have On Hand

    Personal finance expert Suze Orman had some great advice to share when it comes to how much emergency money you should have on-hand. “I always like to have at least an eight-month emergency fund,” she said. Suze recommends looking at your monthly expenses for payments like rent, mortgage or utilities and then multiplying that amount by eight to have enough emergency money saved up. Part of the series Mondays With Marlo on Marlothomas.com.

Other Advice Videos


  • Mike Germano on How to Give Better Advice When Asked for Help

    In Chapter 20 of 23 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, VICE Media Chief Digital Officer Mike Germano answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" Germano shares how advice requests can often be asks for other things, including asking for money. He also learns to know when not to give advice - including unsolicited advice - and instead help others make their own decisions. Mike Germano is Chief Digital Officer at VICE Media.

  • Cathy Erway on Resisting Temptation When Asked for Advice

    In Chapter 17 of 20 in her 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, author and food writer Cathy Erway answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You for Help?" Erway shares how it is important to resist temptation to give advice on topics where you may have a personal agenda. Instead, she finds it better to be patient and try to filter away personal or selfish bias to focus on the person asking for advice. Cathy Erway is an author, food writer, copywriter and radio show host.

  • Phil McKenzie on How to Give Better Advice When Asked for Help

    In Chapter 18 of 20 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, entrepreneur Phil McKenzie answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" McKenzie prefaces his willingness to give advice with the fact that knowledge he shares is based on his own circumstances experience. This brings context to the conversation and prevents him from coming across as judgmental or biased. Philip L. McKenzie is the Founder of Influencer Conference, a global content platform.

  • Jullien Gordon on How to Give Better Advice When Asked for Help

    In Chapter 14 of 19 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, business coach and public speaker Jullien Gordon answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" When asked for advice, Gordon finds it helpful to start by asking questions and not giving answers. This helps him shift his model for personal development from a "let me teach it to you" approach to providing others space to come up with their own answers. Jullien Gordon is a business coach & consultant.

  • Anatole Faykin on The Privilege and Pleasure of Giving Advice to Friends

    In Chapter 5 of 16 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, Internet entrepreneur Anatole Faykin answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" Faykin shares how giving friends' advice is both a privilege and a pleasure. He notes that giving advice is tough, as often a friend is looking to have a listener and to vent rather to actively seek out feedback. Faykin works to discern those who want to vent from those who actually want advice and answers.

  • Matt Ruby on Being Comfortable Not Getting Asked For Advice

    In Chapter 5 of 19 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, standup comedian and Vooza founder Matt Ruby answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help?" Ruby shares how he is not often approached for advice. He finds it may be due to coming across as unapproachable or doing work that is not fully understood by others. While Ruby does not try to avoid people, he shares that not being asked for advice is fine with him and allows him to be left alone.

  • Hattie Elliot on How to Give Better Advice When Asked for Help

    In Chapter 4 of 15 in her 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, entrepreneur Hattie Elliot answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You for Help?" As someone who connects people for a living, Elliot learns the most important part of giving advice is to underpromise and overdeliver. This helps to ensure she is able to meet expectations when making promises. She also learns to refine her willingness to help others to focus on a smaller group of close friends and family.

  • Ramsey Pryor: How to Give Better Advice When People Ask You For Help

    In Chapter 11 of 16 in his 2014 Capture Your Flag interview, product management executive Ramsey Pryor answers "How Have You Learned to Give Better Advice When People Ask You for Help?" With time, Pryor learns to give less prescriptive advice. He learns from his children to give advice is more to be a sounding board and help others make a decision rather than to make a decision for others. Pryor is a product management executive at IBM focused on cloud-based collaboration.