7 Surprisingly Good Jobs You Can Land After A Retail Gig

By Susan Ricker

More than 15 million people work in retail, according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, and a recent CareerBuilder survey found that 33 percent of retail employers are likely to hire seasonal help this summer. Considering the high employment numbers, along with varying education requirements, on-the-job training and transferable skills, a job in retail can be the start of, or next step in, a strong career path.

Here is a look at the skills you acquire in retail, advancement opportunities within the industry and similar occupations to which retail workers can apply their skills.

Skills gained from working in retail
From customer service to sales, retail workers have hard and soft skills that can be transferred to other jobs in the retail industry or a different sector. When you're putting together your résumé or preparing for an interview, build upon the skills that you've gained while working in retail. The BLS names some of the important qualities workers in retail possess, including:
  • Customer-service skills: Retail sales workers must be responsive to the wants and needs of customers. They should explain the product options available to customers and make appropriate recommendations.
  • People skills: A friendly and outgoing personality is important for these workers, because the job requires almost constant interaction with people.
  • Persistence: A large number of attempted sales may not be successful, so sales workers should not be discouraged easily. They must start each new sales attempt with a positive attitude.
  • Selling skills: Retail sales workers must be persuasive when interacting with customers. They must clearly and effectively explain the benefits of merchandise.

Advancement opportunities within retail
If you're not interested in leaving the retail industry, or if you're looking for an advancement opportunity within your current company, know that there's room to move up. The BLS notes, "Retail sales workers typically have opportunities to advance to managerial positions. Some employers want candidates for managerial positions to have a college degree.

"As sales workers gain experience and seniority, they often move into positions that have greater responsibility and may be given their choice of departments in which to work. This opportunity often means moving to positions with higher potential earnings and commissions. The highest earnings potential usually lies in selling 'big-ticket' items -- such as cars, jewelry, furniture and electronics. These positions often require workers with extensive knowledge of the product and an excellent talent for persuasion."

Similar occupations and career options
When looking to what's next in your career, there are a variety of jobs at which you can apply the skills you've acquired in retail. Here are some examples:

Customer service representatives interact with customers on behalf of an organization. They provide information about products and services and respond to customer complaints. Some also take orders and process returns.
Entry-level education: High school diploma or equivalent
Median annual pay: $30,460

Information clerks provide administrative and clerical support in a variety of settings. They help maintain records, collect data and information, and respond to customers' questions or concerns.
Entry-level education: High school diploma or equivalent, though some employers prefer some education beyond high school.
Median annual pay: $29,990

More: 4 Retail Jobs That Pay Surprisingly Well


Insurance sales agents help insurance companies generate new business by contacting potential customers and selling one or more types of insurance. An agent explains various insurance policies and helps clients choose plans that suit them.
Entry-level education: High school diploma or equivalent
Median annual pay: $46,770

Real estate brokers and sales agents help clients buy, sell and rent properties. Brokers and agents do the same type of work, but brokers are licensed to manage their own real estate businesses. Sales agents must work with a broker.
Entry-level education: High school diploma or equivalent
Median annual pay: $42,680

Sales engineers sell complex scientific and technological products or services to businesses. They must have extensive knowledge of the products' parts and functions and must understand the scientific processes that make these products work.
Entry-level education: Bachelor's degree
Median annual pay: $87,390

Securities, commodities and financial services sales agents connect buyers and sellers in financial markets. They sell securities to individuals, advise companies in search of investors and conduct trades.
Entry-level education: Bachelor's degree
Median annual pay: $70,190

Wholesale and manufacturing sales representatives sell goods for wholesalers or manufacturers to businesses, government agencies and other organizations. They contact customers, explain product features, answer any questions that their customers may have and negotiate prices.
Entry-level education: High school diploma or equivalent; some industries may require a bachelor's degree
Median annual pay: $56,620


*Job descriptions, education levels and salary information from the Bureau of Labor Statistics

Susan Ricker is a writer and blogger for CareerBuilder.com and its job blog, The Work Buzz. She researches and writes about job search strategy, career management, hiring trends and workplace issues.



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diananda

As a woman with three degrees, but who lives in a college town, I could not find a job in my field, so I took a job at Macy's. The pay was $9.50 per hour, and I never got a raise in 2 years! The worst job ever! Your shift hours changed every day, and the week-ends and big sale days (Xmas season, Mother's & Father's Day, etc....) were an absolute hell on earth. The store would give the customers 50% off and the lucky employees had to work longer hours. Most sales people started @ $8.50 hr. Raises were extremely rare, maybe 15 cents or 25 cents.
I THINK THAT EXPLAINES WHY RETAIL SUCKS!! The salespeople work really hard and are treated like slaves.

August 14 2014 at 3:19 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
John Lewis

If all this were true and accurate, why does the general public look down on people who work in retail?

Why is retail widely considered a dead end for career potential leading to greater positions and earnings by most non-retail employers?

August 01 2013 at 11:07 PM Report abuse +1 rate up rate down Reply
Jedimom

All sales positions that pretty much rely on commissions to live. You can work retail and NOT be a hard sell person.

August 01 2013 at 5:06 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply

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