Ex-NFL Player Kurt Warner Hosts New Reality Show

'The Moment' Premiere: Woman Gets Her Dream Job at Sports Illustrated​



At some point, all of us face life-altering moments in our careers. How you react could literally change the direction your career takes. That was the situation that expense account manager Tracie Marcum faced when she was offered a chance at her dream career as a sports photographer -- but it would mean reliving one of the most painful moments in the life of the 37-year-old mom: her mother's suicide.

Marcum's dilemma was the highlight Thursday evening on the series premiere of the USA Network's reality show, "The Moment" -- hosted by former NFL quarterback Kurt Warner -- in which an ordinary American gets a once-in-a-lifetime shot at landing his or her dream job (as seen in the video above).

A Sports Illustrated magazine photographer, Lou Jones, asked the Alabama woman to take photos of a skeet shooting session at a gun club. That might sound like a reasonable try-out for a photog, but when Marcum was a young girl (she didn't say at what age) she saw her mother shoot herself to death inside their home. "I don't do guns," she told the camera. "If this is part of my assignment, I can't do this."

Marcum was visibly shaken and began to tear up as she weighed whether to walk away from the assignment that would force her to relive the most painful moment of her life. Marcum, a mother of two, called her husband who advised, "It's kind of a chance for you to come to terms with that memory." Jones, who -- as part of the show -- served as her "mentor," agreed: "This is something you've got to push through."

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And that's what she did. She dove into the photography shoot and overcame the trauma to produce photos that Jones would approve of. The ability to actually deliver the goods was the first instance, after two failed trials, in which she showed she had what it takes. And she'd go on to demonstrate the same acumen during her final interview with the Sports Illustrated photography team at the close of the show, which resulted in her getting the job.

A show spokesperson did not respond to a question about whether the show's producers knew of Marcum's family history before filming. But her extended tryout runs the risk of rubbing the rest of America the wrong way, given the challenges of the "black hole" that many job applicants must deal with in a country suffering from an official unemployment rate of 7.6 percent. The network is planning to air nine episodes at 10 p.m. Thursdays (9 p.m. Central time) this season.

As for Marcum, she succeeded at the very challenge that's at the heart of sports photography -- capturing the moment of the action. For skeet shooting, that's when a shot hits its target, which in this instance was a clay pigeon. Little by little, she began flinching less while taking the photos. "You got that last one," Jones screamed out. "You may have what it takes."
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In her final interview with the SI photo team, Marcum impressed the bunch that included Steve Fine, the magazine's director of photography. Her assignment was to photograph stunt pilots from inside a helicopter. Fine was particularly pleased with the emphasis that Marcum placed on one photo's background. "You give me the little houses on the right," he said. "This is the one where you're telling us a story."

Immediately after the review, Kurt Warner delivered the good news -- SI wanted to offer Marcum a job as a photographer. (Salary was not specified.) The magazine's offer was all the more impressive given that SI's publisher, Time Inc., let go of 500 employees in January during a round of layoffs. (Disclosure: This writer is a former Time Inc. employee but left the company long before that layoff.)

Warner, of course, knows a thing or two about landing dream jobs. After working in a supermarket bagging groceries, he rose to become the MVP of Super Bowl XXXIV back in 2000. Having such a happy ending to a remarkable story, however, carries its own burdens, he said in an interview with AOL Jobs. "It got to a point where it felt, 'enough already,' with the supermarket stuff," he said. "Let me just do my thing."

For her part, Marcum was initially hesitant to accept the job, given that it would require relocation. But with encouragement from her husband, Marcum decided that she couldn't pass up her dream. "I work for Sports Illustrated," she announced with confidence.

Marcum worked at the magazine's New York office for six months before returning to Alabama. According to the show's spokesperson, Marcum is currently freelancing for the magazine covering college's Southeastern Conference.

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Filed under: Success Stories
Dan Fastenberg

Dan Fastenberg

Associate Editor

Dan Fastenberg was most recently a reporter with TIME Magazine. Previously, he was a writer for the Thomson Reuters news service's Latin America desk. He was also a reporter and associate editor for the Buenos Aires Herald while living in South America.

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simmersck

I'm happy for him, Kurt Warner was a great NFL QB and is a gentleman off the field. Go Kurt!

April 15 2013 at 12:11 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
hutt2422

I really enjoyed the show today. I wish I knew how to nominate my brother. He is a high school football coach who has helped many young men into college and the NFL i.e. James Harrison. His knowledge of the game is unbeleiveable and hhis enjoyment is teaching "kids" the game . I have also said he would be a great college or NFL coach but as you know it is hard to get in . Please consider him. Gary Hutt, e-mail hutbuldog@aol.com. He is reaally good Kurt

April 12 2013 at 8:33 PM Report abuse +2 rate up rate down Reply
biffcove

Curt A "GOOD GUY"

April 12 2013 at 6:33 PM Report abuse +2 rate up rate down Reply
Ernest

He's been an ass his whole life, might as well finish it that way. :-)

April 12 2013 at 5:16 PM Report abuse -5 rate up rate down Reply
lthrnck68

It is still just a reality show. Is this just another attempt to hold onto the fame from his playing days? Sure looks like it.

April 12 2013 at 2:26 PM Report abuse -3 rate up rate down Reply
Walt

ANOTHER REALITY SHOW, OH MY GOD, KIRT IS A NICE FELLOW, IN MY OPENION, NBC HAS BECOME A WASTE OF TIME AND THE OTHER NET WORKS ARE RIGHT BEHIND, NETWORK IS 85% TRASH, I CAN['T FIGURE OUT WHO WATCHES THSE PANTY WASTE REALITY SHOWS. MAYBE PEOPLE IN LULU LAND IN NURSING HOMES OR THE MENTAL ILL.

April 12 2013 at 12:54 PM Report abuse +3 rate up rate down Reply

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