4 Job-Search Tips That People Normally Pay Big Bucks To Learn

Job seekers pay big money for a career coach. Here are some tips you can get for free. The idea of paying someone to help you get a job may strike you as absurd. Yet the practice of using a job coach is growing as workers seek any advantage in a tight labor market. But what would a career coach tell you, if you had the bucks to hire one?

Interviews with career coaches uncovered several key job-search tips. Some of them are quite simple -- but often go overlooked. As Miriam Salpeter, a coach and AOL Jobs blogger, notes: "It's not rocket science."

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1. Don't just send in an application and think your work is done. In a bruising hiring environment, applying online can often feel like a black hole. And that's because it often is. The tendency of job seekers to simply send a resume, and do nothing else is "terrible," according to Michael Melcher, the founder of the New York-based leadership development and executive coaching firm, Next Step Partners. (Melcher is pictured on the right, while teaching a leadership development workshop in Haiti.) Which brings us to the second tip.

2. Figure out who you know on the inside. Check out your social networks, like LinkedIn, and see if you know anyone who knows anyone who knows anyone at the company. And don't dismiss third-hand referrals either. A theory called the "strength of weak ties," a term coined by Stanford sociologist Mark Granovetter, holds that acquaintances and loose connections are more likely to open up new opportunities than close friends.

3. Pay as much attention to your social media presence as your resume. When a recruiter checks out a prospective employee, it's very likely that they will do a Google search for the candidate. Having a filled-out a profile on LinkedIn can boost your appeal to an employer. Simple steps, like creating a Twitter account with your name, also can help job seekers create a digital presence. (And while you're at it, don't forget to follow AOL Jobs on Twitter.)

4. Use keywords on LinkedIn. Recruiters are increasingly combing the professional career network to fill open slots, says Salpeter. And one way that recruiters search for prospective workers is though keywords on LinkedIn search. "No one searches for 'vice president' because everyone is a vice president." Instead, Salpeter says, job seekers would be wise to use their title, headline and description as a space to describe professional attributes that help you stand out. (As an example: "Spanish-speaking customer services representative.")

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Dan Fastenberg

Dan Fastenberg

Associate Editor

Dan Fastenberg was most recently a reporter with TIME Magazine. Previously, he was a writer for the Thomson Reuters news service's Latin America desk. He was also a reporter and associate editor for the Buenos Aires Herald while living in South America.

Follow Dan on Twitter. Email Dan at daniel.fastenberg@teamaol.com. Add Dan to your Google+ circles.

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Angela J Shirley

A great article and I would like to add that we as job hunters need to go visit the companies. Why? Sometimes they do not advertise their jobs and by you stopping by their Human Resource Department to ask about jobs will bring attention to you. Now do not be a "pest" as that can put you on the "do not interview" list. I have found this helpful and was able to network with the department. I got the inside scoop on when jobs would be posted and how to get connected to the hiring manager. Usually the online job applications never reach the hiring manager. By following up in person, you can sometimes increase the chances of your application being put in the list to go to the hiring manager. Let's face it, there are thousands of job hunters just like you out there. Be different and try different ways of getting your foot through a door for an interview, then a job offer. http://rockportinstitute.com/

December 12 2013 at 7:55 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
jobtabs

Dan, as usual, a well written article. : -) One thing I would add is that job seekers are not aware of the amount of work involved in carrying out the steps outlined above. Even if they diligently carried out all the steps above, there is still no assurance that they will get a job offer. Job seekers need to realize that they are going to have execute on your prudent advice over and over and over.

I would strongly suggest they browse through the Resumes section of download.com or downloads available on AOL for a tool specifically designed to facilitate the job search. There are powerful solutions available that can do so much to alleviate the stress and anxiety of the job search and I believe it would behoove your readership to consider using one.

As always a well written article that will do much to give job seekers a plan on action. Thank you Dan! : -)

Sincerely,

John P. Coffey, President
JobTabs, LLC
http://www.jobtabs.com

March 11 2013 at 3:48 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Bob Prosen

Landing a job in today’s economy requires you to think and act differently. If you’re wed to the traditional way of job-hunting you’re destined to compete with everyone else chasing the same few opportunities.

The most effective way to get a job is to think like an employer. Sounds simple but many people don’t appreciate the importance or know how to do it.

Before beginning your search you have to understand why all companies hire. It’s to solve problems and your challenge is to position yourself as the solution. In other words, hiring you allows the company to solve problems faster, better and cheaper than they could without you. Here’s how to start.

Step 1 - Identify your skills and expertise.

Step 2 - Find the companies you want to work for and research them to uncover their problems. Use the Internet, Google alerts, read press releases and speak with current and former employees.

Your ability to uncover your target employers’ problems and position yourself as the solution is what will get you hired.

Here are just a few potential problem areas. Completing projects on time and on budget, improve product quality, improve customer service, increase sales, reduce costs, enhance online marketing, etc.

Step 3 – Identify the hiring manager.

Step 4 – Create a personal marketing plan to get your solutions in the hands of the hiring manager.

Step 5 – Develop a “One-Sheet” resume, to separate you from the crowd, along with a set of compelling cover letters that show your experience solving similar problems.

Step 6 – Follow up is essential to getting an interview. Be persistent but not a pest.

As a former executive with several Fortune companies I know how leaders think. People who have followed this process have gotten hired.

Good luck and never give up!

Bob Prosen –
CEO
The Prosen Center for Business Advancement
www.mycareeraccelerator.com

P.S. And yes, this works for recent college grads as well.
P.S.S. Market yourself to the companies you want to work for whether or not they have an opening.

March 10 2013 at 10:16 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Coach Richmand

Job searching in 2013 requires tremendous internet and interpersonal networking skills. As a life and career coach who has worked with hundreds of clients, I find two segments of the population most in need of career coaching - twenty somethings and relaunchers. Twenty somethings have their social media and internet skills perfected, but they are reticent to engage in face-to-face networking. In their world so far, most correspondence has been via text and facebook. They come to coaching wanting to learn how to cold-call for informational interviews, ask for referrals, and even write a letter. On the other hand, many 40+ relaunchers reentering the workforce are lost regarding social media. They don't understand the hidden job market on linked-in, or how to utilize their contacts to the fullest. Even the internet job sites can be daunting. The value of career coaching for both age groups is tremendous. For more information see www.coachrichmand.com

March 09 2013 at 3:07 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Coach Richmand

Job searching in 2013 requires tremendous internet and interpersonal networking skills. As a life and career coach who has worked with hundreds of clients, I find two segments of the population most in need of career coaching - twenty somethings and relaunchers. Twenty somethings have their social media and internet skills perfected, but they are reticent to engage in face-to-face networking. In their world so far, most correspondence has been via text and facebook. They come to coaching wanting to learn how to cold-call for informational interviews, ask for referrals, and even write a letter. On the other hand, many 40+ relaunchers reentering the workforce are lost regarding social media. They don't understand the hidden job market on linked-in, or how to utilize their contacts to the fullest. Even the internet job sites can be daunting. The value of career coaching for both age groups is tremendous.

March 09 2013 at 3:05 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply

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