Shockingly High Salaries At Tech Startups

tech startups pay

The word "startup" for many people conjures up images of a newly formed tech company filled with young, not-too-well paid staffers who are hoping their stock options might be worth something someday.

But that's changing -- at least in tech hotspots, such as Silicon Valley, according to a new online interactive tool by financial adviser Wealthfront (via CNet). The tool, which includes data supplied by nearly 8,400 "non-executives" at 135 privately held technology companies, shows that workers with skills in short supply -- such as software engineers -- can earn six-figure salaries as startups compete to attract and keep talented employees.

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How much could you expect to earn at a tech startup? A lot depends on the type of work you're capable of and how long you've been doing it, along with where in the U.S. you work and the size of the company that's looking to hire.

Wealthfront says that its data show that the mean cash compensation (which discounts extraordinarily high and low salaries) at all tech startups across the country was $112,000. And CNet notes this curious finding: Despite the huge demand for engineers in Silicon Valley, jobs in the Northeast pay more, presumably because companies are competing with Wall Street firms for talent.

But it isn't only high-tech jobs that pay well, as Wealthfront's data reveals. Check out the salaries for these high-tech and not-so-high-tech positions at startups.

  • Software Engineer: $124,000*
  • Human Resources: $105,000
  • Marketing: $95,000
  • Sales: $220,000

*Note: Salaries shown are for mid-career professionals at the 75th percentile, which means that 75 percent of workers in this profession earned less, while 25 percent earned more.

For many more jobs and other options check out Wealthfront's salary tool below.





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David Schepp

Staff Writer

David Schepp has spent more than a dozen years covering business news for the electronic and print media, including Dow Jones Newswires, BBC News, Gannett Co., and most recently at AOL's DailyFinance. Nearly 10 years ago, he started writing a weekly People@Work column, looking in depth at issues facing workers in today's workplace. The syndicated column appeared in newspapers and websites nationwide before it made its debut on DailyFinance in 2010. Schepp now continues that tradition at Aol Jobs, covering the jobs beat and providing readers insight and analysis into the nation's challenging employment scene.

Schepp holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in journalism from Metropolitan State College of Denver.

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Dave Jenkins

Lusterusa - I think that the author used the term shocking in the sense that the amounts are much higher than most people's perception. This is not to say they are shocking in a bad way, just more than one would presume.

I agree with you completely that companies that make billions will pay their employees highly - if they don't they will go to someone else who will!

October 01 2012 at 5:47 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
lusterusa

whats shocking about people being compensated properly to make companies millions and billions of dollars...I don't quite understand the social commentary that people don't deserve to be paid well...when companies are making record profits

September 22 2012 at 1:43 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
lusterusa

whats shocking about people being compensated properly to make companies millions and billions of dollars...I don't quite understand the social commentary that people don't deserve to be paid well...when companies are making record profits

September 22 2012 at 1:38 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply

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