Nearly 1 Out Of 2 Workers Expect Pay Raise In 2012, Survey Finds

workers expect raises 2012One thing many U.S. workers were conditioned to accept during the recent recession was stagnant wages. But with the economy rebounding, more workers than not say they expect a raise this year, according to a new survey by Glassdoor.com.

And they might not be deluded.

Earlier this year, another survey found that the vast majority of employers -- 93 percent -- plan to give employees raises in 2012. Only 60 percent of businesses granted pay hikes last year. In 2010, only 30 percent did.

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Glassdoor's survey, released today, finds that for the first time in four years, more workers (43 percent) expect a pay increase in the next year than those who don't -- 38 percent.

The career website's latest quarterly survey shows that nearly half (46 percent) of the more than 2,000 adults polled expect their company's outlook to improve during the next six months. Unemployed job-seekers also are more upbeat, with more than a third saying that they expect to find suitable employment during the next six months, according to the survey, which looks at four measures of employee confidence.

Still, employed workers' feelings about job security and job-market prospects remain tempered, Glassdoor notes. Thirty percent of those polled said that they believe it's unlikely they could find a job that matches their level of experience within the next six months, an increase of 6 percentage points. Further, a third of respondents said they remain concerned about layoffs.

"Though consumer confidence is up and the unemployment rate is down, employees remain tentative about the market," Glassdoor's Rusty Rueff said in a statement accompanying the survey's results.

"On one hand, positive economic and company indicators are driving increased optimism around pay raises and company outlook," Rueff said. "But that optimism hasn't yet spilled over into individual job security or view of the job market."

The Glassdoor's survey also found the optimism was not shared equally. Some highlights:

  • More men expect a pay raise than do women -- 45 percent of men noted that they expect an increase in the next 12 months, compared to 40 percent of women. The survey also showed that slightly more men (48 percent) than women (45 percent) expect their company's outlook to improve in the next six months. Glassdoor notes those statistics are considerably narrower, than a year ago, when only 28 percent of women were optimistic about their employer's future, compared to 50 percent of men, indicating that optimism among women has grown substantially, while it has ebbed slightly among men.
  • Younger workers are most optimistic. More than half (53 percent) of those 18 to 34 years old say they expect their company's prospects to improve in the next six months; only 42 percent of the older workers, those 55 and older, said that. Nearly half of the younger workers (49 percent) say they expect to receive a pay raise, compared to 34 percent of the older workers.

But, job security remains a concern:

  • One-third of employees (33 percent) worry that co-workers could be laid off in the next six months, with concern highest among employees in the West (39 percent) and the Northeast (36 percent), compared to 29 percent among those in the South and 31 percent for workers in the Midwest.
  • Employees aren't as optimistic about their prospects should they lose their jobs, however. In fact, those who think it is "likely" they could find a job matched to their experience level dropped four points from the fourth quarter to 37 percent while 30 percent think it is unlikely and 32 percent are uncertain.


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David Schepp

Staff Writer

David Schepp has spent more than a dozen years covering business news for the electronic and print media, including Dow Jones Newswires, BBC News, Gannett Co., and most recently at AOL's DailyFinance. Nearly 10 years ago, he started writing a weekly People@Work column, looking in depth at issues facing workers in today's workplace. The syndicated column appeared in newspapers and websites nationwide before it made its debut on DailyFinance in 2010. Schepp now continues that tradition at Aol Jobs, covering the jobs beat and providing readers insight and analysis into the nation's challenging employment scene.

Schepp holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in journalism from Metropolitan State College of Denver.

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dogvodo

Yes there will be a raise BUT now with my $18.00 an hour instead of working 40 hours a week I will now only work 30...some raise huh? just who feels better about that?.....sigh oh yeah now we can be transfered to other locations up to 50 miles from our homes....instead of four miles...add that added gas bill up over a year and there goes two more mortgage payment out my tail pipe.... I had better stop here before this gose into several pages.......

April 09 2012 at 1:53 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
toddisit

1 out of 2? I really doubt it.

Your raise will be when a foot connects with your butt and kicks you out the door. Now that's a raise in America today.

April 09 2012 at 12:45 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Wwhatever747

As generations pass more and more won't work or just don't want to work. The top has to turn upside down, CEOs earn janitor's wages, executives earn workers wages, middle manager gets mininum wages, few needed employees earn CEOs wages and options, bonuses all together.

Pink slip to LISA!

April 08 2012 at 11:50 PM Report abuse +1 rate up rate down Reply
Wwhatever747

They won't get what they expect but the company's CEO gets up to 16% to 33% raise in 2012.

Occupy CEOs, executives and middle mangers!

April 08 2012 at 11:47 PM Report abuse +1 rate up rate down Reply
Lisa

Yep, I gave raises to many this year! Others aren't worth what they are making now so they will be getting pink slips!

April 08 2012 at 8:15 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
1 reply to Lisa's comment
seattlewkr

Uh-huh. I can just imagine what they're getting and what your raises were.

Betcha NOT MUCH.

April 08 2012 at 8:17 PM Report abuse +1 rate up rate down Reply
seattlewkr

1 out of 2 expect a raise?

Expect a surprise then. You'll get a raise, then they'll raise your out of pocket for medical or something else.

April 08 2012 at 6:49 PM Report abuse +1 rate up rate down Reply
raml1219

I work for menards and have not had a raise in 6 years. I have "topped" out at my position and am told that my "bonus" will make up for not having a raise. However, the percentage for my "bonus" goes down every year, so the bonus keeps getting smaller no matter how hard I work to increase sales. But every year the cost of my health insurance goes up. So while I am lucky I am working, I make less money every year.

April 08 2012 at 4:59 PM Report abuse +3 rate up rate down Reply
1 reply to raml1219's comment
seattlewkr

Reality right there

April 08 2012 at 6:50 PM Report abuse +1 rate up rate down Reply
EDDIE

A raise and a pink slip!

April 08 2012 at 4:54 PM Report abuse -1 rate up rate down Reply

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