Most Employees Would Take Pay Cut To Work From Home

work from home

Telecommuting has become a way of life for many workers. Whether they work at home full time or just a few days a month, many appreciate the ability to forgo the commute and would even give up pay just to work from home, a new survey finds.

Twenty percent of workers polled in the U.S. said they would take a 10 percent cut in pay if it meant they could work from home, according to data released Friday from Arise Virtual Solutions, a Miramar, Fla.-based company that helps people in setting up home-based operations to provide customer service for other businesses.

The survey of 350 adults also showed that 34 percent would take a 5 percent pay cut to work from home, while 7 percent would agree to a 25 percent reduction.

About 36 million Americans do all or part of their work from home, an increase of about 10 percent since 2004, according to data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics.

Getting rid of a long commute is one of the most popular reasons people would like to work from home, Arise found, with 32 percent saying they'd most enjoy having no commute.

A similar percentage said working from home would help them better balance responsibilities to work and their families, while 20 percent said the biggest advantage of working from home would be saving money on commuting costs, child care, eating out, clothing and other expenses.

Lastly, Arise says, nearly 4 percent of those polled said they'd most appreciate enjoy not having to be around annoying co-workers.



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David Schepp

Staff Writer

David Schepp has spent more than a dozen years covering business news for the electronic and print media, including Dow Jones Newswires, BBC News, Gannett Co., and most recently at AOL's DailyFinance. Nearly 10 years ago, he started writing a weekly People@Work column, looking in depth at issues facing workers in today's workplace. The syndicated column appeared in newspapers and websites nationwide before it made its debut on DailyFinance in 2010. Schepp now continues that tradition at Aol Jobs, covering the jobs beat and providing readers insight and analysis into the nation's challenging employment scene.

Schepp holds a Bachelor of Arts degree in journalism from Metropolitan State College of Denver.

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andcustomhomes

I am a former college professor and did take an initial paycut when I started working from home. However, once my freelance career was established, I started making significantly more in the long run.

I have been working from home for 12 years and love it! Contrary to popular believe, there really are thousands of free, no scam, no mlm work from home, telecommuting jobs out there. The key is knowing where to find them and following two important rules.

First, never pay for a job, they should pay you plain and simple. Second, if it sounds too good to be true, it is. Now, where do you find the jobs? There is a wonderful no scam, no fee online job database called the "Legitimate Online JobDirectory" at http://www.LegitimateOnlineJobDirectory.com. I do freelance work for many of the companies listed there.

Another place to find good work from home jobs is flexjobs.com as mentioned above. You can also search the major job sites like Careerbuilder, Simply Hired and Indeed. Just be sure to follow the rules above.

I hope this helps!

August 21 2012 at 11:17 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply

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