Employers Are Not Gullible When it Comes to Your Resume

job interview Foolish fibs on your resume are considered full-out lies in the employment world. A resume is no place for stretching the truth, especially when it is an employer's first impression of you. Your resume is not the only indication of who you really are, and many of today's human resource professionals dig deeper to find the truth.

Information about past employment dates, job titles, accomplishments, education and credentials are just some of the areas where people have falsified information on their resume or employment application. As a best practice, most companies conduct background checks, verify degrees and do much more to confirm the information on your resume. It only takes one falsehood, created by you, to leave you without employment. Accurate information is vital to securing employment, no matter the industry or position.

According to research conducted by the Society of Human Resource Managers, 53 percent of individuals lie about a "fact" on their resume. In the same study, human resource managers asked college students about lying on a resume, and more than 70 percent said they would do it just to land their dream job

As a leading background screening organization, HR Plus has noticed some common resume manipulations over the years. And in every case, honesty is always the best policy.


Really, a CEO at 20?

Tailoring past job titles and skills to meet prospective employer demands is all too common. Employers know that it takes certain experience and skills to be placed in a high-level position; typically someone is not going to become a CEO or president of a large organization overnight. Those positions require time and dedication to reach. Skills are harder to verify since they are technical or personal to the applicant, but past employers can be contacted about titles and roles, and they won't lie.


Making the big bucks

According to a survey by Jobacle.com, 27 percent of people exaggerate about their current or past salary. Employers can verify this information simply by requesting past W2 statements as a condition of employment.


Time travel

One of the most common forms of resume fraud is stretching employment dates to cover gaps in employment or to make years of experience match the employer's needs. Prospective employers can easily confirm dates of employment with past employers.


The University of Imagination

Degrees, and even schools, have been fabricated on resumes. In fact, ADP did a review of over two million job applicants in 2001 and found a staggering 41 percent lied about their education in some form. The Internet can prove to be a powerful tool for prospective employers because they can simply do a search of the school and the degree to see if it really exists.


Doctor who?

Listing a false credential, such as a professional license or group membership, can lead you to hot water. Licensing bodies and professional groups have Web pages and phone numbers available to employers to verify the applicant's standing.


Star or slacker

It is great to say you cut expenses by 30 percent or led the development of the company's new widget, but you must be able to prove it. Employers may ask you to show how you cut expenses or explain your role in product development, which would be easy if it were true. However, 15 percent of people lie about their job performance, according to Jobacle.com. Former employers can be called to verify this information.


Dream crushers

It may seem simple enough to supply a good reference who will praise your past work, but applicants have lied about references. Lying about what the reference thinks of you, how well you've worked together or the job title you had while working with this person can haunt you. Prospective employers can interview references about you personally, as well as your job performance.


Homeward bound

Applicants have lied about their address to appear to live closer to a workplace to eliminate concerns over commuting or excuses for not being able to make it to the office. Whether it is a family member's address or that of a close friend, it is still not the applicant's permanent address, and the employer can find out. While it may not seem like a reason to not be hired, it is still lying, and will not make a good impression.


ATTENTION!

People have lied about their time in the military, their rank or even if they were honorably or dishonorably discharged. Military personnel can obtain free copies of their military records or separation papers, so employers may ask for these documents. If the applicant does not have military documentation, the employer may request records from the National Personnel Records Center.


Bon voyage

Saying you were part of a mass layoff is quite believable in this economy, but not mentioning you were singled out due to job performance, or even due to a crime at work, can lead to trouble. Resigning and being fired are also two different reasons for leaving a job. In order to protect their interests, prospects employers can check your employment and criminal history, and inquire whether they should hire you.

It is important to remember that telling the truth is best, because employers can verify almost any piece of information you supply. If any information is found to be false on a resume, you could be taken out of the pool of applicants or terminated, thus jeopardizing your career and future.



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trebordon

According to many job coaches who are present or past HR people, there is a time to withthold staing certain information in a resume-- specifically, things such as one's age. Due to the high prevelence of age discrimination, they advise not to show all your years of experience on a resume regardless of whether that old, dated experience, is the best qualifying experience one has. For example, if you're 60 years old, you will give your age away if you list 35 or 40 years of job experience, and in most cases, by being honest and fothright, you will be bypassed for many positions. It proves the daunting reality that age discrimination in fact ,exists. If Human Resource people were put on the stand and asked to speak the truth about it, perhaps something could be done such as imposing more severe penalties for employers who breach the discrimination laws. We need more police action. The government wants to overhaul the social security program and mandate older workers to continue working even more years before being able to obtain social security benefits. I ask, how is that possible?

March 27 2011 at 11:22 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
ratliff123

do hr people consider being fired and resigning under pressure to be different things or the same? and if you get fired but should not have been, how do you defend yourself without being guilty of "criticizing your former employer"?

March 26 2011 at 7:28 PM Report abuse +3 rate up rate down Reply
Suzanne

As far as I'm concerned, you should NEVER EVER lie on a resume! I can't believe you're basically telling people that some lies are OK. IDIOTS!

March 26 2011 at 5:33 PM Report abuse +5 rate up rate down Reply
1 reply to Suzanne's comment
Rico

how's the unemployment line Suzie????

March 26 2011 at 6:25 PM Report abuse -3 rate up rate down Reply
1 reply to Rico's comment
Suzanne

Its spelled Suzy, and I am not on unemployment. Unfortunatley I've had over 25 orthopaedic surgeries including a RAKA..that means right above knee amputation in case you don't know. I have numerous diagnoses including osteo-necrosis (which means my bones die due to a lack of circulation), nail-patella-syndrome, osteo-myelitis which means if they had not taken my leg, I could have died. I have quite a few more diagnoses but I won't bore you with things you wouldn't understand if I told you!l So get off your high horse and don't speak of things you know absolutely nothing about!

March 26 2011 at 7:04 PM Report abuse +2 rate up rate down
rldarch

Companies lie about lots of things, call them out too. They lie about salary of previous & current employees, job responsibilities, advancement possibilities, insurance coverage, which boss is a big jerk, & ....advertising is basically a big lie.

March 26 2011 at 5:23 PM Report abuse +3 rate up rate down Reply
BRAD & WILLERS

BILL TATE, I COULD TELL YOU STORIES ON HOW I GOT INTO THREE CORPORATIONS AND THEN STARTED MY OWN BUSINESS. BACK IN THE 70'S AND 80'S AND 90'S. I RETIRED A VERY SUCCESSFUL BUSINESS MAN. I WAS ACTUALLY GOT FIRED FOR MAKING TOO MUCH MONEY! AND THEN THE COMPANY THAT FIRED ME ACTUALLY PUT ME BACK IN BUSINESS. I TELL MY STORY AND PEOPLE CAN'T BELIEVE IT. I HAVE PROOF, AND I SHOULD HAVE GRADUATED HIGH SCHOOL BACK IN 1955. MYSELF AND TWO OTHER MEN GOT OUR HIGH SCHOOL DIPLOMAS ON OCTOBER 26, 2010. AND I HAVE A VIDEO OF IT FROM KENMORE WEST HIGH SCHOOL, KENMORE NEW YORK. OPRAH WOULD NOT BELIEVE OUR STORIES!!

March 26 2011 at 5:19 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Donna

Education is the biggest lie, if you can't prove you've got your degree and I mean the University verifies it, don't put it down. Also, people do give poor references just not officially, I know a guy who knows a guy at that company let me check...that type of thing

March 26 2011 at 4:49 PM Report abuse +1 rate up rate down Reply
Robin

Unfortunately, at least a few years ago, obtaining military separation papers other than active duty has been impossible. And any Reserve records are not posted on form DD214.

March 26 2011 at 4:31 PM Report abuse +1 rate up rate down Reply
LL

KSS - Keep it Simple Stupid, is the best way to write a "TRAGETED Resume" and elaborate further during the interview. FIRST, learn all that you can learn about the company you will be submitting your resume to and see if you can discover any areas of interest to you that are sufficient food for fodder during your session; pointing out WHY you are the ideal candidate for that particular position, (if you truly are...) and all of the rest of your history will become irrelevant if you do a good enough job of demonstrating the specific qualities that make you a prime candidate for that position.

March 26 2011 at 4:02 PM Report abuse +1 rate up rate down Reply
patcallo

This is a worthless article. Past employers can not say anything negative unless a court case resulted (criminal or civil). If the do, they may be liable for slander or for breaking a confidentiality law.

March 26 2011 at 3:53 PM Report abuse +4 rate up rate down Reply
2 replies to patcallo's comment
Joebudgie

Patcallo, your'e right technically but there are ways around it. I worked in banking management position for over 30 years and found that sometimes a letter confirming someones title, salary, employment dates and duties is followed up with a phone call (off the record of course) with additional information. If asked to resign it is best to request a letter explaining why you are leaving before you leave. If you didn't leave a company in good graces it is best to explain the real reason or leave it off your resue' entirely.

March 26 2011 at 7:12 PM Report abuse +2 rate up rate down Reply
tyrannosaurusex

I agree, worthless article.

March 26 2011 at 7:12 PM Report abuse -1 rate up rate down Reply
Steve

"Lies to never put on your resume?" One should never lie period. The Bible tells us that we shall all give an account of ourselves to God. A person will never ever be able to fool Almighty God.

Therefore, turn your life over to Jesus Christ, and confess your sins, before it is eternally too late!

"Boast not thyself of tomorrow, for thou knowest not what a day may bring forth."

March 26 2011 at 3:07 PM Report abuse -6 rate up rate down Reply
3 replies to Steve's comment

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