10 Best Cities to Find a Job

job interview You'll have to invest in some serious winter gear if you're interested in moving to the best city for finding employment in America. That title goes to Minneapolis, according to a survey recently done by Ajilon Professional Staffing. According to the study, which was published by Forbes, not one city on the West Coast made the top 10 list, although the others are fairly evenly scattered throughout the rest of the United States.

Ajilon compiled its list using Department of Labor statistics and insights from its regional market branches. Each of the cities on the list has an unemployment rate of 8 percent or lower, below the current national average of 8.9 percent. A number of other factors were also considered in determining the list, including the diversity of industries in the city, cost of living, the range in size of companies offering employment, and level of higher education among its residents.

Minneapolis-St. Paul rose to the top of this year's list partially because of the fact that hiring is on the rise there for many of the big industry players in fields including financial services, health care, retail, and manufacturing -- contributing to a lower level of unemployment.

Also, there's an increased demand in Minneapolis for specialty positions, including specialty tax and compliance, IT audit and SEC-related experience. Combined with additional factors including relatively low cost of living and low crime and poverty rates, the Twin Cities comes out on top of the list.

You'll find much warmer temperatures in the second best city. That would be none other than the very hip Austin, Texas. It rated high on the list because of its low cost of living and diverse talent pool. Austin's thriving educational community also contributed to boosting job growth in the market. Home to several major universities, including the University of Texas, local businesses can select from a vast pool of well-educated recent graduates.


2011's Top 10 cities:
  1. St. Paul, Minn.
  2. Austin, Texas
  3. Salt Lake City, Utah
  4. Boston, Mass.
  5. Milwaukee, Wis.
  6. Richmond, Va.
  7. Albany, NY
  8. Baltimore, Md.
  9. Pittsburgh, Pa.
  10. Dallas, Texas


"All of these cities possess unique characteristics such as low cost of living and heavy diversity of industry that bring about an optimal environment for low unemployment in their areas," said Jodi Chavez, senior vice president at Ajilon Professional Staffing.

Next: 10 Worst Cities for Finding a Job



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Lisa Johnson Mandell

Lisa Johnson Mandell

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Lisa Johnson Mandell is an award-winning multi-media journalist and author of Career Comeback--Repackage Yourself to Get the Job You Want.  Her work has been translated into 20 different languages, and she is a frequent expert guest and commentator on news and talk shows. She has been featured in The Wall St. Journal, on the CBS Early Show, NBC Today, CNBC, Fox Business News, Dr. Phil, Oprah.com and many other media outlets.  Lisa discusses her AOL pieces each week and interviews vital guests on the web TV show, This Week in Careers. Learn more on LisaJohnsonMandell.com.

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lil-snoopy!!!!

Hey hey hey whats happening people?

December 16 2011 at 4:55 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
TradingClearly

Of course, Washington, D.C. is frequently touted as among the absolute best places to look for jobs, thanks to an expanding government trying its hardest to combat unemployment. When times get tough, lobbyists, contractors, and interest groups redouble their efforts in Washington, ensuring the money keeps flowing their way in the face of budget cut threats.
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October 25 2011 at 4:25 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Gaelle

Low cost of living in Austin?? How did you come up with that info?

March 22 2011 at 1:04 PM Report abuse +1 rate up rate down Reply
1 reply to Gaelle's comment
hook3mh0rns

http://www.payscale.com/cost-of-living-calculator/Texas-Austin/. Compared to other major cities, Austin's cost of living is good. Seeing as how many people are coming to Austin now, I'm sure the cost of living is going to change drastically in the next couple of years. I do wish articles like this wouldn't get posted since it just seems to attract more people to Austin and cities alike.

May 26 2011 at 1:30 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
RMS

It's the same story everywhere, too many people competing for too few jobs.

March 22 2011 at 11:34 AM Report abuse +1 rate up rate down Reply
dswaldren

You're info on Austin is ridiculous. The very criteria stated for making it a great place to find a job is what makes it a BAD place to find a job. The large, "diverse" talent pool are all competing for the same few jobs. No one wants to leave here after they graduate, and the entire state of California is moving here. You do the math....

March 22 2011 at 10:43 AM Report abuse +1 rate up rate down Reply
1 reply to dswaldren's comment
Kevin

So true!

June 13 2012 at 4:38 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
DawnellDaugherty

There are over three thousand jobs in the Portland ,Oregon and Metro areas in various industries;Intel, located in Hillsboro,is predicting a huge hiring spree in months to come. If your interested,go to:www.Oregon.gov.

March 22 2011 at 10:33 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
DawnellDaugherty

Simplyhired,Indeed,Dice.com,Monster.com,Linkedin.com,Jobscentral,American job exchange,are just a few websites outside the traditional employment dept. sites to look for work;also hiring[depending where you live,and if these companies are located there]: Fastenal,and Schwans foods.There are jobs out there ,it's a matter of knowing where to look.

March 22 2011 at 10:12 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
doywoods8

That's right, send more people to the state I live in (Texas) , immigrants and all!!!!!!!!!!!!! Wow, I just came back from a JOB hunting road trip, spent 500 dollars in cash for gas with no luck. Ok, the jobs available are in law, and I am not likeing that. Prison gaurds to beat cops, no no, I am an auto tech., rancher, cotton gin manager, floor sweeper, etc., not too pickey, but this is not the state or any other, in this economy, to find a job. Wish Obama would have spend all the stimulus money on job creation instead of helping Fannie Mae, Wall Street, etc., those are as fraudulant as he is.

March 20 2011 at 4:53 AM Report abuse +4 rate up rate down Reply
icaticus

The Twin Cities? Seriously? I live on the Minneapolis side and I know a ton of people that have been out of work including myself and the forcast here is that more businesses are leaving every day. The job market is starting to pick up a little but thats just seasonal. Jobs are opening everywhere right around this time because the next fiscal years budgets are comming out. Doesnt mean anything would be better. Especially in the tech field. Usually IT is the last to really feel the crunch and the last ones to recover.

March 20 2011 at 4:16 AM Report abuse +1 rate up rate down Reply
camosrn

If you are remotely interested in the healthcare field, find something with in you would like to do. As an R.N. I can work anywhere in the world and, in fact when the world ends, medical people will be the last ones with jobs. LOL. Seriously, we use so many techs in hospitals, some requiring less than a years training. Healthcare positions pay better than average, are always available and enable you to give something back to humanity while making a living. I have been a Registered Nurse for 30 years, have work in many different cities and specialties and currently practice my nursing in Hawaii, where I've decided to retire. Give healthcare a chance. You don't have to wipe butts and clean up vomit, or even make a bed. Look at your local hospitals job needs on line. You may be surprised and begin an entire new career that will be there until you are ready to retire. May you all find the job you want.
Just a hint for all the brothers and sisters who are struggling to find a career. Check into healthcare.

March 20 2011 at 4:14 AM Report abuse +3 rate up rate down Reply
1 reply to camosrn's comment
Lindsey

I really hope you're right!! After working for 4 years at $35,000 a year in NYC as a victim advocate with a student loan debt of $70,000, I decided to go back to community college for nursing. I graduated with my B.A. in Sociology in 2007 with the intent of going to law school -- after watching a bunch of my coworkers go to law school, graduate with a $200,000 loan debt, and not find employment, I decided against it. The only friends I have with jobs that pay well are all in healthcare -- one is a nurse making $75,000 with a BSN, the other is a podiatrist making $120,000. Everyone else is either unemployed or work as retail managers.

March 22 2011 at 4:22 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply

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