The Highest-Paid Medical Jobs

medical jobsIncome is all relative, not only when you compare your income to someone else's, but also when you compare it to the different stages of your career. Ideally, your salary as you near retirement is higher than what you earned during your teenage or college years. Your view of what constitutes a high salary also evolves over time.

Common first jobs are part-time or temporary summer gigs that put some cash in your pocket and let you start saving up for a car. At that age, you're just happy to have money you can call your own. You might earn a little more in college, or you might earn less if you're an unpaid intern. When you decide to take a job that's a step toward the career you want, you get serious about salary requirements and benefits. You're more likely to shop around so you know what you should be earning and can negotiate your salary.


How does your salary stack up?

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the national mean income of all full-time workers is $41,231. When you look at that figure, you realize the average person isn't loaded and bringing home six figures every year. Not only are most Americans not in the financial stratosphere of the overspending, gaudy caricatures on reality TV, but we're not even near the fictitious income levels of TV characters. Your favorite TV cop or journalist might have a normal job, but a salary of $41,231 doesn't allow you to live in a sprawling (and smartly furnished) condo in Manhattan.

Still, for a mean salary to exist, someone has to earn less and someone else has to earn more. In some careers, certain workers are earning more. Much more. In some cases, 10 times the national mean. As you might expect, many of these jobs are in health care, and the biggest moneymakers require an M.D. Health care is growing and will continue to grow for the foreseeable future, so the combination of demand, educational requirements and experience to attain those jobs positions them for good pay.

To give you a glimpse of which workers are earning the biggest bucks, here's a list of the highest-paying medical professions today:


1. Top surgeon

Salary: $489,695


2. Neurosurgeon

Salary: $478,585


3. Perinatologist

Salary: $395,407


4. Hospital administrator

Salary: $385,003


5. Orthopedic surgeon

Salary: $355,470


6. General surgeon

Salary: $326,113


7. Cardiologist (noninvasive)

Salary: $318,843


8. Neonatologist

Salary: $315,758


9. Cardiologist (invasive)

Salary: $315,197


10. Anesthesiologist

Salary: $313,316


11. Diagnostic radiologist

Salary: $307,986


12. Therapeutic radiologist

Salary: $303,290


13. Urologist

Salary: $298,561


14. Otolaryngologist

Salary: $297,260


15. Gynecologist

Salary: $289,555


16. Obstetrician

Salary: $288,645


Next: Today's 20 Fastest-Growing Occupations >>



Anthony Balderrama

Editor

Anthony Balderrama is a writer and blogger for CareerBuilder.com and its job seeker and workplace blog, TheWorkBuzz.com. He researches and writes about job search strategy, career management, hiring trends and workplace issues. You can follow him on Twitter at twitter.com/abalderrama and view his blog posts on TheWorkBuzz.com.

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iceman

These people earn whatever they earn.. You should be outraged by what basket ball players make. These morally corrupt excuses for humans do nothing for our populace and don't even play a full year and football players who have dog righting and such. Doctors take years of education and are not passed onto the next class because the coach says so. I wish I could work just a few days of the year and make that kind of money because they can play a kids game well... Get real the ball players produce nothing act like jerks and think the world must praise them.

September 24 2010 at 6:53 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Medical Health Blog

I appreciate the concern which is been rose. The things need to be sorted out because it is about the individual but it can be with everyone
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Medical Health Blog

June 03 2010 at 1:27 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
John

Abby, Comparing the four years of undergraduate a teachers takes (making collages, fabricating teaching plans, taking blow-off classes) vs. the four years of straight A's" a physician must have in natural sciences ....it is beyond ridiculous. The teachers I went to school with never studied and still were given good grades. They are among our poorest educated.

May 06 2010 at 7:02 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Martha

I never realized how very committed many physicians are until I dated a few. I have seen a neurosurgeon called out at all hours of the night because he was needed after a car accident, his life was never his own, he was always on call for others. I dated a cardiologist who was one of the nicest men I ever knew, and his patients loved him too. He saved many lives. I have been with him at dinner when people would come over and tell him how grateful they were for the care a relative received. Many of these people lived in poverty to go thru years of school. They deserve whatever they make! By the way, there are many occupations that make more than the average physicians salary, and yet you rarely hear a lot of complaining regarding them.

May 06 2010 at 3:08 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
rusty

The joke is DF, you can't read. I didn't say anything about being "good" teachers, simply that their education qualified them to teach.

Lets try it again, slowly. All Dr's can teach, NO teachers can doctor. Good or bad is irrelevant, especially when it comes to teaching.

Doctors can be fired for incompetance, teachers can't.

Again, it's a no-brainer regarding the salary disparigy.

Read carefully before commenting this time. Save yourself some embarrassment.

April 26 2010 at 2:46 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
1 reply to rusty's comment
DF

Yet you're wrong again...plenty of teachers are fired every year for incompetence all over the place. It's called "non-renewal" of their contract. Maybe you should know what you're talking about before you comment...it'll save you some embarrassment :)

And I stand by my first comment...just because a doctors are qualified (on paper) to teach, doesn't mean that they CAN teach.

April 26 2010 at 7:34 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
chris

Don,
As I happen to be one of those teachers you are talking about, couple quick things. No, I don't get to retire at 50, actually the age is 62 in CA, and your right, can be as much as 90% of salary. Though,that will be almost 35 years of paying into a retirement system. As far as social security goes, you may want to check your facts, I can't collect social security. The almost 10 years I spent paying into it I never get back. We are not allowed to receive both no matter what we paid into social security. If you would like to know who gets the best of both worlds, retires at 50 with almost 100% of their salary and usually does not have to worry about paying back those huge student loans, check out some of the jobs in the public sector ( not educational ). Fact is, most of us are working are as... off and it is about time that those that aren't, are no longer given a free ride.

April 20 2010 at 11:43 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
shar145

DF...I am looking at the Pennsylvania teacher salaries website right now. Our highest paid elementary grades 4-6 teacher makes 90,000 with a master's degree and 30 years experience. There is a teacher with 19 years experience and a bachelor's degree making 81,980. There is a middle school art teacher making 90,800. So yes, teacher's in pennsylvania do make that kind of money. Google teacher salaries in pennsylvania. They are all listed.

April 20 2010 at 10:44 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
1 reply to shar145's comment
DF

Yeah...you're talking about at the end of their career..."with 30 years experience." Sharon's statement "...not bad for four years of college" implied that first-year, just out-of-college teachers were making that kind of money. That's simply not true.

April 26 2010 at 12:35 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
rn-spuse of md

Jerome,
Yes we do need health care reform. However, Obama's current plan will affect every aspect of health care except one ... the lawyers and malpractice. Malpractice and legal costs are some of the biggest contribitors to rising health care costs. Everything I have read about this plan address how doctors, hospitals, insurers, employers, patients, etc. willbe affected. There is no mention of tort/malpractice reform. With that said the plan is doomed to failure. Every country that has a successful universal/government health care system has some form of tort reform. This is not all about the greed of doctor's, you need to look at the greed of lawyer's as well. Additionally, lawyers pay malpractice premiums of a few thousand dollars a year, not upwards of over 6 figures as some doctors do.

April 20 2010 at 9:52 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Larry

The doctors are worth eavery penny. If lawyers which are mostly bankers or politicians had to pay the amount to go to school doctors did and malpractice insurance premiums you could not afford one lawyer. look how much they are overpaid now!!!

April 20 2010 at 8:17 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Jack

Gail,
You are correct. I have the greatest respect for special education teachers. I lasted 7 days in an attempt to reach special ed. kids. I have little respect for math and science teachers who majored in education. They just lack the knowledge of the subject that they majored in! I agree that there are highly competent teachers in their subject matter e.g., math and science and cannot communicate to their students. And I agree, they too should not be in the class-room! I apologize for the word "stupid".

April 20 2010 at 6:27 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply

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