The First 100 Days in a New Job

new jobEx-Citigroup executive Steven Freiberg was recently tapped to become the new CEO of E-Trade, a company that experienced severe losses due to risky mortgage investments during the credit crisis and recession. His performance is sure to be followed closely by people close to the industry and the media during his first 100 days in his new job to see if he can create change within the organization.

Even if your new job is not CEO of a large, well-known company, your performance will also be watched more closely during your first 100 days on the job. If you have recently accepted a new position or hope to land a new position soon, here are some tips for managing those first critical 100 days.

-- Compare your salary to a CEO's.


  1. Study up. You prepared for your interviews by researching the company and understanding their strengths and challenges. Now that you are in the job, use the first 100 days to dig deeper into the company's mission, brand proposition, and reputation in the market. Read everything you can get your hands on that references the company.

  2. Crack the company code. When you begin a job at a new company, it can sometimes feel like you've just moved to a foreign country. Many companies have their own acronyms, lingo, inside jokes, etc. Try to buddy up with someone who can act as a translator to get you up to speed quickly.

  3. Showcase your strengths. You talked about your strengths during the interview process and leveraged past stories of success to prove your value-add. Take charge of a project you know you can deliver on and then make sure that you do.

  4. Document your accomplishments. It's never too early to start documenting job successes. One year from now, when it is time for your performance review, you want to be able to cite your accomplishments throughout the year, including those achieved within those first critical 100 days.

  5. Break bread with colleagues. A lot of critical information about the company will not be found in annual reports or monthly newsletters. In order to understand the unofficial rules, company politics, and corporate culture, you need to have ongoing conversations with both management and people in the trenches.

  6. Find a mentor. Connect with someone who is more senior than you and has significantly longer company tenure than you. A mentor can help you manage your career by putting you in front of the right people and exposing you to the right resources.

  7. Dress the part. Don't put away your interview suit just yet. Observe the dress code around you; but remember, you may still be scrutinized more closely than your colleagues. Play it safe and always choose an appropriate, but possibly more conservative, style.

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Keith

mmsty's post was apparently deleted. It was a spam post selling some stupid service.

April 05 2010 at 11:30 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
vrhpatricia

??? I don't see any post by "mmsty"???

April 05 2010 at 9:10 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
killer

ALL U NEED IS A GOOD SENSE OF HUMOR AND ALWAYS STAY ALERT!!, MAYBE A PERSON DON`T FIT W/ THE COLLEAGUES DUE TO THAT THEY MIGHT BE A SHY PERSON.IF UR THE THE TYPE OF PERSON THAT THE 1RST CONVERSATION IS ABOUT THE WEATHER, U SUCK.MAYBE START W/HOW LONG U BEEN W/THIS COMPANY AND WHAT IS THE OUTCOME OF THIS COMPANY, THEN U COME UP W/ OTHER CONVERSATION, LIKE WHAT U SAW ON TV. MAYBE COMEDY,HORROR, BUT SAY SOMETHING, AND U WILL GET A FRIENDLY RESPOND.WELL U ALL HAVE A SAFE YEAR.

April 05 2010 at 7:50 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Don\'t need \'em

The first impression is ever so critical. Like it or not, people will make a judgement soley on your apperance. And the first conversation I have with superiors or subordinates is the perfect time to list my accomplishments. I usually postpone my shortcomings after I have established a rapport with my fellow workers. And I downplay my bad judgements and rarely, if ever, mention the several times I was arrested for drunk driving and shoplifting.

April 05 2010 at 7:42 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
rusty

"you want to be able to site your accomplishments throughout the year, including those achieved within those first critical 100 days."

Site? You're fired.

April 05 2010 at 7:13 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
linda

good read

April 05 2010 at 6:53 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
Industrialmetalfreeeeek

Great post Sylvia. The sad fact is that most office working environments are just as you described.

April 05 2010 at 4:53 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
trish

Good advice. A little food for thought. thanks

April 05 2010 at 4:16 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
sylvia U torelli

I am also a little bit nervous about starting a new job.
I have been unemployed for over a year now. The job that I left was full of nasty, and unprofessional people, so Im glad that I left. They had different values, than I had, and I didnt seem to fit in with their conversations, and ideas. It was defenetely time to look for a new and better job! Sometimes, its best to leave a job, if it causes you to change
your beliefs, and personal standards. I think that I had been a good role model for the other workers, and I always tried to stand my ground, when it came to how I behaved at work. I did learn alot about how to handle various difficult situations, and will continue to be a good role model at my new job, and hope that they will look up me, for my standards, and personal
esteem in ethics!

April 05 2010 at 3:48 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply

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