25 Best Jobs for Boomers

seniorsBaby boomers, those born between 1946 and 1964, are nearing retirement age. The U.S. Census Bureau estimates that there are 78.2 million boomers, and that every hour, 330 of them turn 60. That means an entire generation of workers might leave the work force in the coming years.

But they might not.

Many baby boomers are choosing to postpone retirement and stay at their current jobs or find new ones. Some can't afford to retire, but many want to explore new avenues. After decades of working in jobs that paid the bills but didn't fulfill them, they're moving to different industries.

For their book "225 Best Jobs for Baby Boomers," authors Michael Farr and Laurence Shatkin decided to comb through data to discover what the best jobs are for baby boomers. They looked at salaries, projected job growth and the number of openings to calculate which jobs have the most promise.

Farr and Shatkin break down their findings in more than 70 lists, ranging from the best-paying jobs to the best jobs for boomers age 45-54. Whatever your criteria are, Farr and Shatkin have the job for you.

Below you'll find the list for the 25 overall best jobs for all baby boomers:


1. Management analysts

What they make*: $67,005

Projected annual openings**: 78,000


2. Teachers, post-secondary

What they make: $68,456

Projected annual openings: 216,000


3. Logisticians

What they make: $44,563

Projected annual openings: 162,000


4. General and operations managers

What they make: $93,594

Projected annual openings: 260,000


5. Registered nurses

What they make: $66,427

Projected annual openings: 215,000


6. Anesthesiologists

What they make: $310,132

Projected annual openings: 38,000


7. General internists

What they make: $351,307

Projected annual openings: 38,000


8. Obstetricians and gynecologists

What they make: $285,254

Projected annual openings: 38,000


9. Family and general practitioners

What they make: $198,221

Projected annual openings: 38,000


10. Psychiatrists

What they make: $191,080

Project annual openings: 38,000


11. Surgeons

What they make: $322,281

Projected annual openings: 38,000


12. General pediatricians

What they make: $181,764

Projected annual openings: 38,000


13. Medical and health services managers

What they make: $94,269

Projected annual openings: 33,000


14. Financial managers, branch or department

What they make: $101,963

Projected annual openings: 71,000


15. Treasurers, controllers and chief financial officers

What they make: $172,946 - $240,588

Projected annual openings: 71,000


16. Chief executives

What they make: $382,705

Projected annual openings: 63,000


17. Government service executives

What they make: $167,766

Projected annual openings: 63,000


18. Private sector executives

What they make: $169,570

Projected annual openings: 63,000


19. Pharmacists

What they make: $108,499

Projected annual openings: 23,000


20. Lawyers

What they make: $116,810

Projected annual openings: 53,000


21. Education administrators, elementary and secondary school

What they make: $150,467

Projected annual openings: 31,000


22. Administrative services managers

What they make: $86,666

Projected annual openings: 40,000


23. Sales representatives, agricultural

What they make: $53,034

Projected annual openings: 44,000


24. Sales representatives, chemical and pharmaceutical

What they make: $88,049

Projected annual openings: 44,000


25. Sales representatives, electrical/electronics

What they make: $51,105

Projected annual openings: 44,000



Next: Acing a Job Interview After Age 50 >>


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Jonathan

Hi everybody,my company is hiring,I'll show you how to run it out of your home,part time ,fulltime,you make your schedule. It is sales related,but I will try my best to help you make your first few sales,even give you some if need be to help. So email me everybody is welcome to work,you're hired..My email address is wealthisgoodhealth@gmail.com, I'll send you a copy of a well known book that should raise your motivation level,free just for responding

January 03 2010 at 7:57 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
willow

More realistic listings should have been sales. I entered the furniture sales field at 50. It required no education other than what was offered at the job. It pays anywhere between 30 to 80 thousand. Good job, no overtime, no education(most have college degree nowadays), and they could care less how old you are. Where I work the youngest salesperson is 47, most of us are in our 50s, and the oldest is 72. It's totally commissioned based, allowing for an above average salary if you're good. When I started three years ago I had no experience in furniture sales, and had only sold part-time back in college.

For boomers, I would try sales.

December 07 2009 at 10:49 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
GAIL

Anthony Balderrama, CareerBuilder.com writer needs to go back to school for a degree in Common Sense and Realism. He may be 90 by the time he graduates. I cannot add to the realistic great comments. p.s. AOL stop posting such idiotic articles.

December 07 2009 at 4:14 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
bmk

guess everyone here is on the same page(riri,earlymusicus, teri,amy,oy vey)...this article was written by someone who is clueless...i could do his/her job and make up stats and toss in bs to get the aol readers in a frenzy, how much does it pay? signed baby boomer in need of a job asap!!!

December 07 2009 at 3:47 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
bmk

jim, ron i agree. i am just making the mark in the age bracket the article referred to, i've been out of work and can't even get a job at a local dept. store...i have a college degree and all the other hoopla experience needed for many jobs, it is frustrating to read articles like this one and too late to turn back the clock and go to med school and too early to cash in on my "huge" social security check that i've paid into since i was 15...!

December 07 2009 at 3:38 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
carey

Are you now saying that 25% of thet kids today all of a sudden now have this missing gene? Would this not have been around before? Explain that?

December 07 2009 at 2:12 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
forelectric

There is no way anyone can make this sort of money in this economy where qualified experienced people are made worthless thanks to the American Bankers who screwed up the economy and got billions in bail-out money and yet they put all thier fees up knowing the recovery of the economy they screwed up will take a life time- at least a century!!

This is all just a make up figures by recruiters who gets paid for making false informations on the web!!!

December 07 2009 at 1:36 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
weebles

Oh, yeah, I want to spend a few more years seeking a whole new education at 55, get my graduate degree at about 57 or 58, have potential loans to pay off, only to be snooted at by 30 year olds who somehow landed their job based on the Peter Principle. Which they probably never heard of anyway.
Try getting a writer over 50, at least one to be realistic for a change. This article is complete wishful thinking at its most realistic. p-i-t-i-f-u-l.

December 07 2009 at 1:03 AM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
John

I changed careers six years ago in order to follow my dream of becoming a teacher and I would love to get a job doing just that (I am credentialed, experienced, highly qualified and 59) - the reality check in California is that there are too many teachers available - a colleague that is an elementary teacher tells me that over 44 qualified applicants showed up for the four jobs available in her district - in my own field (music) I have spent the last six months looking, but not finding - 15 to 17 younger, recently graduated people have shown up statewide for nearly every opening. The only ones who have been typically hired are under thirty and recent grads who speak Spanish - frequently, only in an inner city war zone.

This article is only one of many that still tout becoming an educator as a "hot" career target. Colleges are still advertising to find new applicants for their "hot" career paths into education - by the way, how many more new teachers are already in the pipeline to graduate in the next year or three? This article's suggested potentials is way off the mark in my opinion.

December 06 2009 at 11:43 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply
djv

I'm a teacher, making $58,000 a year after 10 years of full time work. It's not as if a new teacher could make anywhere near what the article says. I'm in California, which pays higher than most other states too, and I'm still not at the level they claim. And what Med School is going to accept a 50+ year old student????

December 06 2009 at 11:43 PM Report abuse rate up rate down Reply

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